WWE Superstar Drew McIntyre And His Fondest Rugby Memory

first_imgThe Scottish hero harks back to 1995 and one iconic moment FONDEST RUGBY MEMORY(Getty)Mark CoffeyNXT UK Superstar“One of my favourite memories of watching rugby was the 2008 Heineken Cup final. I was a Munster fan and they beat Toulouse. We had all played in the morning, then went home for a quick change and then headed straight to the pub to watch it!”You may not know that Glasgow’s Mark Coffey wrestles on the NXT UK brand, and he played for St Aloysius’ College as a schoolboy and then briefly at GHA as a teenager before dedicating himself to ring life. So the pathway from rugby to wrestling is not as impossible to navigate as one might first think.This first appeared as part of a feature in Rugby World magazine in January. Related: Rugby to Wrestling – A special feature LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Drew McIntyre is one of the biggest names in professional wrestling at the moment, but did you know that the WWE Superstar is a fan of rugby too?As part of our recent deep-dive into WWE’s desire to uncover rugby talent that could make it in the world of Sport Entertainment, we found out the Scottish star’s favourite rugby memory (as well as that of fellow countryman and NXT UK Superstar, Mark Coffey).Here are those treasured memories.FONDEST RUGBY MEMORY(Getty)Drew McIntyreWWE Superstar“A good memory was at my Aunt Gwen’s house watching South Africa win the World Cup in 1995. I remember being with my family and watching Joel Stransky get that final drop-goal in extra time and being super happy when they had won. That’s definitelya good memory, I must have been around ten years old.” Headlock: Drew McIntyre competes with Braun Strowman (Getty Images) Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Moving forward requires letting go of the past

first_imgMoving forward requires letting go of the past August 16, 2012 at 1:15 pm While I understand the author’s premise and even agree with his conclusions, I find it sad that he, too, is doing some demonizing on his own part. The “greedy rich” certainly stereotypes an entire class based solely on their income and attaches failures of character to individuals who are financially successful. This makes it all the more difficult to establish any sort of meaningful dialogue from which a positive result may issue. The “Weak, ineffective, self-serving and risk-averse leaders ” may be principled, intelligent people who still hold the values they were raised with. Is it appropriate to malign them because they do not think the same thoughts and base their decisions on the same premises that you do.My point is simple. To accomplish any real change in a church will require the participation of everyone, the forward thinking, modernized saints whom you seem to think are the only acceptable members of the current Episcopalian Church AND the greedy, weak, self-serving others who provide most of the money that allows the aforesaid saints to maintain their churches and the base from which they can do Christ’s work.As my previous paragraph shows, demonization of ANY group is easy, working with them is the challenge. We need to be very careful of language as it is a tool that can promote or discourage that cooperation. [Religion News Service] Comparing today with yesterday is a popular yet pointless pastime.For one thing, we rarely remember yesterday accurately. More to the point, yesterday was so, well, yesterday — different context, different players, different period in our lives, different numbers, different stages in science, commerce and communications.Seeking to restore the 1950s — grafting 1950s values, lifestyles, cultural politics, educational and religious institutions — onto 2012 is nonsense. It sounds appealing, but it is delusional.That world didn’t disappear because someone stole it and now we need to get it back. It disappeared because the nation doubled in size, white people fled racial integration in city schools and women entered the workforce en masse. It disappeared because factory jobs proliferated and then vanished, prosperity came and went, schools soared and then soured, the rich demanded far more than their fair share, overseas competitors arose, and medical advances lengthened life spans.The comparison worth making isn’t between today and yesterday. It is between today and what could be. That comparison is truly distressing, which might explain why we don’t make it.Take, for example, our presidential politics. With modern communications at their disposal, major parties could be engaging citizens in a vigorous national debate on issues that affect our lives. Instead, the greedy rich are bankrolling attack ads whose purposes are to belittle and dehumanize the opposition and to prevent any serious grappling with reality.Advances in technology could be nurturing an economy of ideas, innovation and personal reinvention. Instead, great minds are harnessed to create games and social networking. The most significant innovations are in government spying, bank finagling and commercial data mining — none of which will end well for citizens.Tools that give knowledge workers the ability to work anywhere could be leading us to repopulate the heartland and breathe new life into Rust Belt cities. Instead, young knowledge workers congregate in already-crowded coastal cities where the bars and restaurants are better.The aging of baby boomers could be a glorious moment — a fresh cadre of healthy volunteers for churches and not-for-profits, affordable housing entering the market, lower cost of health care, increased stability for families.Instead, boomers are made to feel like locusts about to strip the land. Banks won’t work with them to sell houses, the health care industry ramps up prices, employers steal their pensions, and churches offer stale vision and control battles. Cynical politicians stand ready to harvest their discontent.When I work with congregations, I show them how to do a “gap analysis.” Look at best practices, look at actual practices, study the gaps between optimal and actual, and work on narrowing the gaps. One key question is always, Who benefits from keeping the gap wide? Who would obstruct an action plan for moving forward?The answer usually lies in leadership. Weak, ineffective, self-serving and risk-averse leaders fight against change as if theirs was a holy cause. They cling to control as if only their interests mattered.As we compare today and could-be on the larger stage, we see the same leadership deficits: politicians whose deceitful and feckless campaigns promise feckless terms in office; business leaders driven entirely by short-term gains in personal wealth; education dominated by bureaucrats and fundraisers; cities and towns run by the divisive and corrupt; government run by lobbyists-in-training.The way forward doesn’t lie in some halcyon yesteryear. It lies in letting go of yesterday and pursuing what could be, even when the self-serving stand in the way.— Tom Ehrich is a writer, church consultant and Episcopal priest based in New York. He is the author of “Just Wondering, Jesus” and founder of the Church Wellness Project. His website is www.morningwalkmedia.com. Follow Tom on Twitter (at)tomehrich. Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 15, 2012 at 7:30 pm I enjoyed and profited from Ehrich’s article. Yet, I also wonder about letting go of the past. This all depends on what “past” it is which is to be let go. The Catholic tradition, and the Episcopal part of it, has developed out of its past including the great councils of The Church, the development of theological views both Latin and Eastern, the rites in which theology has life and rite have meaning, and the like. To our great harm easily forget this in an attempt to be “contemporary” and “relevant.” To forget THIS past is to gut The Church and attempt to transform it into something which, in essence, it is not. It is this past which sets the boundaries of the possibilities of the future for the Episcopal Church. If not, the wherein is our distinctive “gifts” to the contemporary world?Certainly the Fifties and Sixties were not “happy times” for intellectual and spiritual growth within The Church. Fuzzy thinking and practice based on such fuzzy thinking is never a “happy thing.” But even these times ought not to be forgotten lest we do similar things again under the same flag of “relevance” and what is “good” for our times. of course this “good for our times” is a fuzzy notion itself if we have no concrete measure of “good.” And I do not mean a pragmatic measure such as the increasing congregation sizes, money collected for social work purposes, and the like.Certainly The Church has reinvented itself throughout history, A casual reading of Church History from the early days of the Apostles until now shows a changing picture. But, the Catholic change is well orchestrated in terms of the past traditions. This we ought not ever to forget for to do so is to abandon The Church as the Episcopal Church.Just some thoughts along the way form an interested layman — Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest John McCann says: August 15, 2012 at 11:43 pm AMEN! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH August 16, 2012 at 9:34 am To Tom, I think it is unhelpful to blame white people and the “greedy rich” for the problems of TEC and our country. We should, instead, be searching for positive ways to improve the human condition.Where would we be if endowments had not been established years ago, by the same group you seem to demonize, to further God’s work. Also, generations of Americans have always worked to make life better, more comfortable and easier, with less work and more play, for their children and grand children. Why, then, are we surprised when some in the current generation, instead of working for the betterment of our society, are focused on developing and playing computer games? We actually got what we worked so long and hard to achieve. Another example of the “rule of unintended consequences”. And finally, there are plenty of fine bars and restaurants in the Mid-West and Southern states. Some, I would dare to say, are even as hoity-toity as those on the East and West coasts. August 15, 2012 at 9:00 pm I am an Episcopal parish priest, now between calls, because I got exhausted from some of the very things about which you write in your excellent article. I’m coming to believe that people are so scared today with the state of the economy, “politics as usual” in Washington, the possibility of losing pensions and homes due to corporate greed and underwater mortgages, that all they have left to hold onto is the past: those days when “we used to have 100 kids in Sunday School and the pews were always filled!” What parish priest today hasn’t heard that? I hope I’m speaking for many in saying, “We’re tired of hearing it!” And here’s another one from a clergy colleague, quoting a parishioner, “What’s wrong with the Church today is that parents just aren’t raising their kids like we did.” Good golly! I came back from General Convention so fired up from my experiences of love and friendship and compassion and exciting liturgies and examples of thriving mission, and I am so proud to be an Episcopalian! Let’s get this Episcopal Church fired up with the Five Marks of Mission and the new budget based on those priorities, and preach and teach the priorities of Jesus vs. the world’s priorities,even if it has to be to half-filled (or empty, depending on optimism vs. pessimism) churches. And for churches that just want to spend their limited resources on fixing up their aging buildings: maybe they could glob together and form “The Church of the 20th Century, Past.” It could even be non-denominational, since these past-minded churches/people seem not at all interested in the Mission of the Episcopal Church in the 21st Century. For a sign of hope and inspiration for the future of the Church of the teachings of Jesus, listen to Jim Wallace’s address to the recent graduating class of VTS, titled “Unexpected Hope in Hopeless Times.” It certainly has given me hope in my recent seemingly hopeless time. August 15, 2012 at 11:08 pm Moving forward does not necessarilly mean letting go of the past. For example we are not going throw out the Constitution of the United States or the Declaration of Independence nor are we going to let go of The Book of Common Prayer, The Holy Bible or the Creeds. Also the leaders of our church are not weak,ineffective ,or self serving. The whole church like the world at large is facing change at a breath taking pace . Facing this change and the resulting effect tests the courage of many dedicated and sincere people. Given this reality our goal must be to breath new life into the overwhelming theme and mission of the church which is salvation. The message of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and his grace is the same for us as it was that first Pentecost. What is our mission it is to bring prople to Christ. But the question remains how do we do this ? I think the there is not one answer there are many. I also know that is it much easier to downgrade any organization than it is to build it up. Also I believe that the rejection by many people of the church is not the church’s fault. The decision to accept the vision of Christ in ones life is a decisionthat all believers must make. Our work is to provide new and creative opportunities to do this. Featured Events Rev Sandra McCann MD says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Pamela Sten+ says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA August 15, 2012 at 8:36 pm John, I envy the fact that you have such time and talents to offer! And I’m amazed they’re not being tapped in your parish. Did you hear about Resolution D066 that we adopted at General Convention? It’s at http://www.generalconvention.org/gc/resolutions?by=number&id=d066. It directs TEC — through the office of Bishop Sauls — to establish an “Episcopal Network of Volunteer Executives and Professionals … to provide management and administrative counsel, support and training to clergy, vestry members, administrators and other persons in congregations, dioceses and provinces ….” I wonder if this might be a marvelous outlet for your gifts. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Cathedral Dean Boise, ID By Tom EhrichPosted Aug 15, 2012 Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Comments (10) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET August 16, 2012 at 3:27 pm Thanks, Christine. That’s exactly what I was trying to say. John Schaffer says: Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Lisa Fox says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Dennis Latta says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME August 16, 2012 at 9:35 am There’s a big difference between letting go of the past and forgetting the past. One can let go of the past without forgetting or abandoning the rich lessons and traditions it provides. To forget the past is to lose all the wisdom and richness of tradition that comes from the past. To let go of the past is to use that wisdom and tradition to inform how we respond in the present and plan for the future WITHOUT TRYING TO MAKE THAT PRESENT OR FUTURE EXACTLY THE SAME AS THE PAST. Holding on to the past is a normal human response to anxiety about the present and fear of the future. We think that by holding onto the past (or some inaccurate memory of what we think the past was like, as Tom so eloquently pointed out), we can somehow stop the anxiety and fear. Change is scary, but change is also how the Holy Spirit works in our lives. We will never see “thy kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven” if we can’t let go of the past enough to let the Holy Spirit change who and how we are today and tomorrow. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Frank Harrison says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN John Schaffer says: Alecia Moroz says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Christine Tetrault says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT August 15, 2012 at 6:04 pm This is one of the most refreshing and honest words I have heard from the Episcopal Church. I am one of those baby boomers, have an amazing global resume, in fundraising, cultural affairs, and thouoght I could transition those skills to the church. I joined Trinity Walll Street with great enthusiasm, the church has been good to me, but they cant seem to find a place for my skills, I am now looking at Jerusalem, other locations. We could become a leader in affordable housing, and other things, but they seem more focused on turf wars between the Vestry and the Clergy, which I might add is outstanding. Right now, I am on the brink of financial ruin, I am one of those invisiblle types because I shine my shoes and wear a tie to church. If only they knew, or cared to know, I AM NOT the only one. I have the time (due to disability) the energy and the faith, yet after a year of offering servuces U have one self- discerned project to work on. We arent in the 50’s but some of the congregation acts like we are in an episode of “Mad Men”. Rector Washington, DC last_img read more

Resumen del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano: 2 de noviembre

first_img Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 5, 2012 Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Resumen del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano: 2 de noviembre Proyecto bíblico, informe sobre el sionismo cristiano, respuestas medioambientales en curso Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Episcopal News Service – Auckland, Nueva Zelanda] Muchas cosas suceden cada día durante la 15ª. reunión del Consejo Consultivo Anglicano (CCA). Además de los otros informes de Episcopal News Service, he aquí algunas otras cosas que tuvieron lugar el 2 de noviembre (hora local), el séptimo día de la reunión que se extiende desde el 27 de octubre hasta el 7 de noviembre.La Biblia en la vida de la Iglesia, proyecto de tres años de duración que aspira a “una lectura bíblica más amplia y más plena” ha encontrado “algún descenso en la lectura bíblica”  en el ámbito de la Comunión Anglicana, pero “sobre todo encontró el espíritu de entusiasmo, descubrimiento y desafío que provoca la lectura de las Escrituras en colectivo”, según un informe discutido el 2 de noviembre.“Compromiso profundo, descubrimiento nuevo” [Deep engagement, Fresh Discovery] explora la manera en que el compromiso con la Escritura y la interpretación de la misma se ven en diferentes partes de la Comunión Anglicana. El CCA solicitó el proyecto en su 14ª. Reunión en 2009 por vía de la Resolución 14.06. El informe, con materiales para el estudio bíblico, puede encontrarse aquí.El proyecto creó una red de grupos regionales a través de la Comunión para explorar cómo las diferentes regiones abordaban e interpretaban la Biblia. Revisó lo que la Comunión Anglicana ya ha dicho respecto a la Escritura a través de las resoluciones de la Conferencia de Lambeth, los informes oficiales y los informes de diálogos ecuménicas. Comisionó una investigación basada en varios estudios ya existentes para explorar como “los anglicanos ordinarios” ven y entienden la Biblia, e hizo acopio de toda una gama de materiales para dedicarse más profundamente al estudio de la Escritura.El arzobispo de Cantórbery, Rowan Williams, escribió en el informe del proyecto que él espera que aportará a la Comunión una “lectura bíblica más amplio y más pleno, en la cual resultarán claros los esbozos del singular relato de la creación y la redención”.“Ser una Iglesia bíblica es sin duda ser una comunidad que vive esta extraordinaria historia día por día y la recomienda a diario a las personas como la mayor verdad posible acerca de la naturaleza de Dios y del mundo de Dios”, escribió él.David Moxon, arzobispo de la Iglesia Anglicana en Aotearoa, Nueva Zelanda y Polinesia, que presidía el comité gestor, dijo que el proyecto es la primera vez en la historia de la Comunión Anglicana en que las iglesias han lanzado deliberadamente una mirada a “la manera en que los anglicanos alrededor del mundo se acercan a la Biblia”.Moxon hizo notar que un resumen del proyecto describe un importante hallazgo, “inquietante tal vez” de que “la manera en que los anglicanos se relacionan con la Biblia resulta ser tan importante como su contenido”.La afirmación, dice el resumen “no impugna el lugar y la autoridad singulares que la Escritura tiene en la vida anglicana, pero sí destaca la importancia, tal vez ignorada hasta ahora, de los contextos en los cuales, y de los procesos a través de los cuales, se escucha y se lee”.Stephen Lyon, coordinador del proyecto, le pidió a los miembros que divulguen ampliamente el informe “de manera que podamos encontrar vías de penetrar en el torrente sanguíneo de la Comunión Anglicana”.“Nuestra esperanza es que esto se convierta en un cuaderno de trabajo, más bien que un simple informe” que se engavete y se olvide, afirmó.Ian Douglas, miembro del CCA y obispo de la Diócesis de Connecticut, llamó al “Proyecto la Biblia en la vida de la Iglesia” uno de los acontecimientos más fascinantes e importantes de nuestra vida en las últimas décadas”. Foto para ENS de Mary Frances Schjonberg.Ian Douglas, miembro del CCA y obispo de la Diócesis de Connecticut, llamó al proyecto “uno de los acontecimientos más fascinantes e importantes de nuestra vida en las últimas décadas”.Luego de la presentación del informe, los miembros del CCA discutieron secciones del mismo en sus mesas. Josephine Hicks, miembro del CCA en representación de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo posteriormente en el pleno que su grupo llegó a la conclusión que si dos individuos arriban a diferentes interpretaciones después de leer el mismo pasaje bíblico “eso no hace que mi interpretación sea correcta y la suya errónea; ambos podemos resultar mutuamente enriquecidos por nuestras interpretaciones”.El Consejo aún está debatiendo una resolución acerca del trabajo del proyecto y su rumbo futuro.El Consejo ‘se da por enterado’ del informe sobre el ‘sionismo cristiano y pide revisionesUn informe de 33.000 palabras, con el título, ciertamente muy desprolijo, de “¿Tierra de Promesa? Una exploración anglicana de las actitudes cristianas hacia Tierra Santa, con especial referencia al ‘sionismo cristiano’”, provocó un debate durante la sesión vespertina del Consejo.El sionismo cristiano se define en el informe como una creencia entre algunos cristianos de que el regreso de los judíos a Tierra Santa, y el establecimiento del Estado de Israel en 1948, se produce de acuerdo a la profecía bíblica… y en consecuencia merece apoyo político, económico y religioso”.El informe proviene de un equipo de trabajo de la Red de Intereses Interreligiosos.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori dijo que en el contexto de los Estados Unidos donde “estos temas resultan inmensamente divisivos y politizados, un informe como éste será de inmensa ayuda en el intento de reunir tanto las divisiones políticas dentro de Estados Unidos… como los conflictos que tenemos en nuestras relaciones ecuménicas en Estados Unidos”.Ella resaltó que muchas otras denominaciones cristianas en EE.UU. se han situado firmemente de un lado o de otro, y “luchamos realmente por tratar de integrar la culpabilidad de todas las partes implicadas, incluido el gobierno de Estados Unidos”, apoyar a la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén y “llamar todas las personas a la activa labor de la reconciliación”.El arzobispo de Cantórbery, Rowan Williams, escribió en un epílogo al informe que “no le caerá bien a los que no encuentran nada que discutir respecto a los problemas de Tierra Santa en la actualidad, aquellos para quienes las cuestiones fundamentales resultan tan claras como el agua.”Sin embargo, añadió él, “este informe plantea con toda exactitud la interrogante fundamental de lo que será perdurablemente justo para todos”.Los segmentos que causaron mayor preocupación con algunos miembros del Consejo aparecen en el capítulo final que se llama “Localizando nuestros puntos de vista”.Tony Fitchett, miembro del CCA por [la provincia de] Aotearoa, Nueva Zelanda y Polinesia, dijo que la sección titulada “Convenimos en que todos los anglicanos podemos y debemos afirmar lo siguiente” es “sospechosamente próxima” al tipo de “confesión de fe” que la mayoría de los anglicanos rehúyen. Y añadió que dudaba que todos los anglicanos convendrían con la lista subsiguiente.Sus 25  enunciados de presuntos acuerdos van desde “Dios está igualmente interesado en todos los pueblos y todas las tierras”, hasta “el Estado de Israel es un Estado nacional establecido, y sus ciudadanos tienen derecho a vivir en seguridad, paz y libertad” y “los palestinos en Cisjordania y Gaza tienen derecho a vivir en libertad, paz y seguridad sin ocupación militar ni apropiación de [sus] tierras, y a la autodeterminación”.De la misma manera, el capítulo incluye 12 “creencias y actitudes” que son “inaceptables dentro de las fronteras de una interpretación anglicana de la fe cristiana”. Éstas incluyen la noción de que Dios le ha dado Tierra Santa o Jerusalén a cualquier comunidad. Hay también una lista de “opiniones significativamente diferentes”, entre las que se incluyen el “deber moral de los cristianos de apoyar al Estado de Israel a la luz de la historia del antijudaísmo y del Holocausto” y “el llamado a la acción directa en pro de los palestinos como un imperativo primordial para los cristianos”.Ian Douglas, obispo de la Diócesis de Connecticut, sugirió “que el hecho de que los nombres [de los miembros del equipo de trabajo] no aparezcan en el informe podría dar lugar a una teoría de conspiraciones” y pidió que se añadieran.El informe es “un resultado directo de las conversaciones que se sostuvieron en Jamaica” en la 14ª. Reunión del CCA, dijo Sue Parks, coordinadora de estudios teológicos de la Oficina de la Comunión Anglicana, quien fuera designada a asistir al equipo de trabajo que redactó el informe. La introducción del informe dice que la red sugirió al Comité Permanente que podía informar sobre el tema en esta 15ª. Reunión.“Este informe esta tratando de trazar un rumbo donde se corre la posibilidad de ofender absolutamente a ambas partes”, dijo ella en respuesta a las inquietudes que se ventilaron, y añadió  que “algunas de las críticas más cáusticas que hemos tenido hasta ahora provienen de la comunidad judía”.Ella destacó que el equipo de trabajo consultó con los anglicanos de la Diócesis de Jerusalén, así como con miembros de las comunidades palestina y judía de allí.Al final, el Consejo aprobó una versión corregida de la resolución que se le propuso acerca del informe. Los miembros del Consejo convinieron en “darse por enterados” del informe en lugar de “acogerlo” como decía el lenguaje original de la resolución. También le pidieron al equipo de trabajo que revisara ciertos aspectos del lenguaje y que lo devolviera al Comité Permanente de la Comunión Anglicana, que luego estaría autorizado a recomendarlo a las provincias para que lo estudiaran y reaccionaran al respecto.Entre tanto, Michael Jackson, arzobispo de Dublín y presidente de la Red de Intereses Interreligiosos (NIFCON, por su sigla en inglés) dio a conocer una versión del informe en Dublín un día antes de que el CCA lo discutiera, de manera que la nueva versión (que se espera se publique en marzo) será diferente de la que algunas personas ya han comenzado a leer y a estudiar.El consejo sigue considerando respuestas [a los problemas] del medio ambienteLuego del foro que tuvo lugar en la noche del 1 de noviembre (hora local), el Consejo Consultivo Anglicano dedicó tiempo a debatir en grupos de reflexión la manera en que la Comunión podría seguir abordando las preocupaciones sobre el medio ambiente.En ese foro, el arzobispo de Cantórbery, Rowan Williams, y el arzobispo de África del Sur, Thabo Makgoba, así como el obispo de Fijí, Apimeleki Qiliho, retaron a los presentes a abordar el daño medioambiental como parte de su deber cristiano.El 2 de noviembre, el obispo Makgoba, que preside la Red Medioambiental de la Comunión Anglicana, les dijo a los miembros que la Comunión había estado prestando atención a los problemas ambientales pero “debemos hacer mucho más, no como las organizaciones no gubernamentales, sino como pueblo de fe”.“La enormidad de estos problemas no pueden llevarnos a la inercia”, sino que deben llevarnos a la acción, afirmó él.Posteriormente en una sesión informativa de prensa, Makgoba explicó que, como comunidad de fe, la Comunión es portadora “de un mandato bíblico de parte de Dios de que debemos cuidar de la tierra” y trabajar “a favor de la justicia para aquellos que están afectados por la crisis medioambiental”.Él dijo que los problemas morales suscitados por la crisis son también sacramentales para los anglicanos. “Como cristiano anglicano…cuando uno no tiene agua ni saneamiento adecuado y yo voy y celebro la Eucaristía y mezclamos agua y vino, ¿me detengo a preguntarme cuantas personas obtuvieron el agua de una perforación y cuántas mujeres fueron violadas en el camino a conseguir el agua?”Los problemas del agua potable y del saneamiento adecuado son cruciales debido a la multitud de enfermedades causadas por la falta de ambos, dijo Makgoba, quien apuntó que él está siendo conocido en su país como “el arzobispo de las letrinas y los inodoros”.“La Iglesia es el pobre”, dice Bill Godfrey, Obispo de la Diócesis del Perú, al Consejo Consultivo anglicano el 2 de noviembre (hora local). Foto para ENS de Mary Frances Schjonberg.Bill Godfrey, obispo del Perú y miembro del CCA por la Provincia del Cono Sur de América, contrastó el estado actual del medio ambiente con la imagen de la estrecha comunión con Dios y la creación en los primeros capítulos del Génesis.“La situación en que estamos se debe a nuestro pecado y a nuestra separación de Dios”, afirmó. “Parecemos estar separados de la creación, separados lo unos de los otros y, en cierto sentido separados —distanciados— de Dios”.Godfrey sugirió que “es parte de nuestra condición de cristianos el interesarnos en la creación”, añadiendo que a Dios le importa nuestro interés por la creación tanto como le importa nuestra obra de reconciliación.Su diócesis fue la sede de la reunión de la red que sesionó en Lima del 2 al 10 de agosto de 2011, y que produjo la Declaración y el Plan de Acción de Lima.En su diócesis hay “kilómetros y kilómetros de abyecta pobreza, de personas viviendo en casuchas… no hay saneamiento, no hay agua potable, no hay baños”, dijo Godfrey. “La gente a veces me pregunta si uno trabaja entre los pobres. No, la Iglesia es el pobre. Noventa y cinco por ciento de la Diócesis del Perú es pobre”.Qiliho dijo en la sesión informativa de prensa que su diócesis en Fijí se enfrenta a problemas relacionados con la necesidad de reubicar a personas lejos de las tierras que se están inundando por un aumento del nivel del mar. “Estamos pidiendo equidad” en ese proceso, dijo, y que recuerden que “es nuestra fe, nuestra creencia, la que nos hará salir adelante”.Makgoba pidió que cada provincia designara un enlace con la red “de manera que estemos plenamente presentes y visibles” en todas las provincias, y Godfrey alentó a todos los miembros de la comunión y del CCA a “estar al tanto y seguir las noticias de lo que [la red] está a punto de llevar a cada una de nuestras diócesis en los años venideros”.La primera resolución que el CCA aprobó en esta reunión el 30 de octubre (hora local) provenía de la Red Medioambiental de la Comunión Anglicana. Recomienda la declaración de Lima, le pide a las provincias que “celebren, apoyen y alienten los ministerios —tanto ya constituidos como nuevos— de alimentos sostenibles y agricultura, conservación [de las fuentes] de agua potable y de la energía renovable”, considera incluir una estación de la creación en su año litúrgico y estimula las medidas a favor del medio ambiente en todos los niveles de la Comunión. – La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

West Texas: New growth and restoration at Camp Capers

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An eight-room, two-story lodging facility stands next to the new Steves Hall and overlooks the Guadalupe River.[Episcopal Diocese of West Texas] The camping program at Camp Capers in the Episcopal Diocese of West Texas continues to grow, with rising participation numbers in summer camp, retreats throughout the year, and a three-phase facility improvement project that is well underway.Camp Capers, located in Waring, Texas, is in its 66th year of summer camps for young people in school grades three through 12. This year, as summer sessions began, construction efforts of a $3 million-dollar capital campaign came to completion. This first phase of renovation of the camp property yielded a new state-of-the-art meeting hall, welcome center, health care center, amphitheater, and lodging facilities.The 78-acre property of Camp Capers was acquired in 1944, purchased for the diocese by Albert Steves, Jr. In deep appreciation, Steves Hall, the main meeting hall at Camp Capers, was named for Steves and his family. The original facility included a gathering area, rooms with a total of 12 beds, and a small infirmary.“There is so much history here, and we’ve had two Steves Halls in the first 65 years of Camp Capers,” said Rob Watson, director of Camps and Conferences. “It was time to build a beautiful, larger, and multi-functional hall to honor the Steves family and their legacy and to serve the needs of our diocesan family.”The new Steves Hall is a one-story building constructed of Douglas fir. Exposed beams and recessed lighting cross the ceiling. Large glass doors line three sides of the meeting area, and a wrap around porch overlooks the Guadalupe River with views of surrounding oak trees.Steves Hall also includes a full kitchen, laundry facilities, a smaller conference room, and a room filled with electrical outlet cubby holes for camp staff and visitors to charge all portable devices. The facility is fully air-conditioned.Separate from the main Steves Hall, two brand-new, two-story lodging facilities provide more places for camp staff and retreat groups to stay overnight. Each facility is two stories, one with eight rooms, the other with 12. Bedrooms in both lodges have two full-size beds and a private bath. A deck and porch wraps around all four sides of each lodge.The new Welcome Center at Camp Capers houses a registration and staff offices, an alumni room, and summer camp store.An older cabin on the camp property, which served as living quarters for the on-site cook during the summer, received an incredible face-lift during construction. The refurbished building serves as the new Welcome Center and features the registration office, camp store, and an alumni room complete with a coffee bar and tables. “The alumni room will remain open. We want those who cherish this place to be able to come in when they can, have a cup of coffee, and relax,” said Watson.An expansive front porch welcomes visitors at the front of the center. Rockers and benches offer resting spots with views of the ropes course and the surrounding Texas Hill Country.The previous camp registration office was transformed into the new Health Care Center. The center, with more space to utilize than the most recent infirmary, houses the summer nurse’s living quarters, two isolation rooms with two beds each, and a first aid and reception area where campers can come for their medications and/or urgent needs.In addition to the new facilities, other projects were included in Phase I of the Camp Capers’ development plan. The 250-seat Will Stocker Amphitheater was built entirely of limestone and overlooks the Guadalupe River. This summer, closing services of camp sessions are being held in the amphitheater, where parents and friends have space to watch and participate. The amphitheater was proposed by the Stocker family in thanksgiving for Will, who was a Camp Capers’ camper and music director and was involved in the life of the diocese. Will died in December of 2010.A few shade structures have been built near the ropes course and riverbank, with benches and tables underneath to escape the warm Central Texas sun. Fifty oak trees will be planted this fall as part of the ongoing tree planting ministry at Camp Capers, which has resulted in 300 new trees since 2008.A dedication service of the new buildings is scheduled for Sunday, Oct. 20, at 3:30 p.m. at Camp Capers. Camp alumni and friends, as well as clergy from around the diocese, are invited to attend.Learn more about Camp Capers in the Diocese of West Texas here. The diocese also has a retreat and conference center on Mustang Island near Corpus Christi, Texas, and a summer adventure program in James Park, Colorado.— Laura Shaver is the communications officer for the Diocese of West Texas. Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL January 23, 2014 at 2:02 pm Excellent story John – please let me know if you have any others about Camp Capers.Blessings,Rob WatsonDirector Camps and ConferencesEpiscopal Diocese of West Texas Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Laura ShaverPosted Aug 20, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (1) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem West Texas: New growth and restoration at Camp Capers Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rob Watson says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

2 Episcopal priests among El Salvador bishop nominees

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Anglican Communion, Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing August 21, 2014 at 12:31 am The Reverend Lee Alison Crawford handled our Mothers burial and funeral arrangements in Vermont a few years ago. At my advancing age of 70ish when my Mother passed at 91, Lee took this whole family under her wing. She was an amazing light when needed, said all the right things to family that needed her boost. Mother had been cremated and Lee took her ” home” the night before the burial so she would not be alone. This spoke volumes to all of us. I am a convert to The Catholic Church but am still amazed when I think of the wonderful ceremony she performed for a woman she had never met. Mother was a very active participant at Trinity Episcopal Church in Rutland, Vt. And Lee was a ” weekend warrior” . She is so incredible. I hope her gifts will be well used in El Salvador. She is so very worthy . Sandra Young, daughter of Barbara Hubbard Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Bishop Elections Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments (1) [Episcopal News Service] The Anglican-Episcopal Church of El Salvador recently named five priests, including two in the Episcopal Church, as candidates to be its next bishop.The five nominees are:The Rev. Ricardo Bernal, Diocese of El Salvador;The Rev. Juan David Alvarado, Diocese of El Salvador;The Rev. Juan Antonio Méndez, Diocese of El Salvador;The Rev. Vidal Rivas, senior priest, St. Matthew’s/San Mateo Parish, Hyattsville, Maryland, Diocese of Washington; andThe Rev. Lee Alison Crawford, vicar, Church of Our Saviour at Mission Farm and canon missioner to El Salvador, Diocese of Vermont.The person elected on Aug. 23 will succeed Bishop Martin de Jesús Barahona, who has led the diocese since 1992.The Anglican-Episcopal Church of El Salvador is a part of Iglesia Anglicana de la Region Central de America (Anglican Church in Central America), along with the dioceses of Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Panama. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ By ENS staffPosted Aug 20, 2014 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA 2 Episcopal priests among El Salvador bishop nominees Rector Pittsburgh, PA Sandra Young says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

Irish Catholics, Anglicans unite for Saint Patrick’s Day service

first_img Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments (1) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books March 18, 2016 at 11:27 pm I greatly appreciate ENS for bringing us these AC stories about hopeful and happy occasions when churches are showing such unity. Also, it is wonderful to see girls choirs, young women lifted up, and given a central place in a celebration of the Eucharist. Comments are closed. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Hugh Hansen PhD says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Anglican Communion Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Posted Mar 18, 2016 Archbishop Michael Jackson and Archbishop Diarmuid Martin with the combined choirs of Christ Church and St Mary’s Pro cathedrals. Photo: Lynn Glanville[Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of Ireland and Roman Catholic Archbishops of Dublin joined the Choirs of Christ Church Cathedral and the Girls’ Choir of St Mary’s Pro-Cathedral, took part in a united service on the eve of St Patrick’s Day to convey a powerful message of Christian unity. The service, on Wednesday evening this week, united the choirs’ voices united for “a magnificent and historic Festal Choral Evensong.”The service was led by Archbishop Michael Jackson and Archbishop Diarmuid Martin and was the brainchild of Christ Church Cathedral’s director of music, Ian Keatley.Keatley grew up in the context of the Troubles in Northern Ireland and “has always been inspired by the way in which the Feast of St Patrick creates a strong and positive sense of unity throughout the island of Ireland,” the Church of Ireland said in a statement.In his sermon, Archbishop Jackson said that St Patrick had brought everyone together in the cathedral for a celebration of the gift of faith given by God to the people of Ireland. He said that the contribution of a faith tradition to any country was hard to gauge and in the Ireland of today it was difficult to see anything other than a decline in religion.“This is an extremely dangerous place to be and to settle down for the evening because it means that our custodianship of the tradition does not get a chance to breathe into the society of today with the freshness it deserves,” he said. “We do a disservice to others and to ourselves. This caution is of a piece with what I keep telling myself in my day-to-day work: It is not about me, it is about them; and also with what I tell to those who work with me: It is not about you, it is about them,” the Archbishop said.“Every generation deserves to get a chance to live by faith and it is a large part of our role as Christian people to lay these chances before others and to learn from their discernment of the same chances which we have failed to spot. Our purpose is, in that old-fashioned word, to convict them: to convict, that is to convince and to persuade and to assure, them of three things about the Christian Faith: its compassion, its courage and its coherence,” he continued.Drawing on St Patrick’s Confession, Archbishop Diarmuid Martin said that the saint described himself as a sinner. However, he said Patrick’s awareness of being a sinner meant that he could recognise the grace of God. He continued that Pope Francis, in his first interview after his election as Pope, also described himself as a sinner.“It is when we identify ourselves as sinners that we truly appreciate the abundance of the infinite mercy of God,” the Archbishop said. “No human sin can prevail or limit the mercy of God. One who considers himself in the first place a sinner can never be harsh or arrogant in his judgement of others.” Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Irish Catholics, Anglicans unite for Saint Patrick’s Day service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Lutheran pastor William C. Nelsen named interim president of Episcopal…

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Canticle Communications press release] The Rev. William C. Nelsen, an experienced college administrator, nonprofit executive and Lutheran pastor, will serve as interim president of Episcopal Divinity School (EDS) during the 2016-2017 academic year, the Rev. Gary Hall, chair of the seminary’s board of trustees, has announced.“I am delighted that Bill Nelsen has agreed to serve as interim president of EDS,” Hall said. “He has long experience in the church and academy, and deep respect for the school’s commitment to social justice. His leadership will ensure the continuity of EDS’s historic mission both in the transition and beyond. I welcome him as a colleague in charting the course of EDS both now and for the years ahead.”For nearly 18 years, Nelsen was president of Scholarship America, the largest private sector scholarship organization in the country. Prior to that post, he was president of Augustana University in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and vice president, dean and professor at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. In recent years, he has served in interim positions as vice president of development at North Carolina Wesleyan College, vice president for university relations and development at Tennessee State University, and university minister for advancement and church relations and interim president at Midland University, where he also received a bachelor degree in 1963.“EDS has had a long-standing devotion to excellence in theological education, inclusiveness and social justice. With my experience in both academic and church settings, I am looking forward to working with the people of EDS in forging new and exciting ways to serve both church and society,” said Nelsen, who was a volunteer with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1965, when the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was the organization’s president.After earning his undergraduate degree, Nelsen was a Fulbright scholar in the former West Germany before earning an M.A. in religion and society through a joint program between Columbia University and Union Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Pennsylvania. He has published widely on faculty development, higher education funding issues, and nonprofit management. In 2008, he was ordained in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America after completing coursework at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He has served as a pastor and director of the Lilly Endowment Project for equipping clergy and laypeople in the Southwestern Minnesota Synod of the ELCA.In July, the EDS board voted to end degree programs in July 2017 in order to conserve the seminary’s resources for its future mission. At that meeting, the Very Rev. Frank Fornaro ‘96, who has served as interim president and dean since 2015, announced his resignation but has continued to serve during the search for his replacement. Nelsen was chosen unanimously as president by both the trustees’ transition committee, which conducted the search, and by the board in a meeting by phone today. He was one of four candidates identified by the transition committee in consultation with the Registry for College and University Presidents, a Boston-area organization that helps higher education institutions identify veteran leaders for interim placements. He will lead a search for an Episcopal chaplain who will attend to the school community’s spiritual and pastoral needs.“I was impressed by Bill’s knowledge of EDS and his commitment to the school’s mission; his support for the actions the board has taken; and his interest in helping the school move forward in furtherance of its mission and of the work of the church,” said Christopher Holding, chair of the board’s transition committee. “His open and pastoral manner and his command of the governance structures will serve us all well in the months to come.Nelsen is married to Margaret (Margie) Rossow Nelsen and has three children and six grandchildren. The couple has traveled widely in Europe, the Holy Land, Africa, North and Central America, and Asia. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ecumenical & Interreligious, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Posted Sep 6, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Theological Education Lutheran pastor William C. Nelsen named interim president of Episcopal Divinity School Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL People, New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Q&A: Bishop F. Clayton Matthews on helping shape the House…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Clay Matthews and Betsy Jutras, College for Bishops administrative assistant and events coordinator, set up a projector for a June 14 session of Living Our Vows, the college’s three-year formation program for new bishops. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] When Bishop F. Clayton “Clay” Matthews retires from the Episcopal Church’s Office of Pastoral Development on June 30, he will leave having made an indelible mark on the House of Bishops.Matthews began that work in 1998. During that time, he refined and reshaped many of the office’s ministries. The office supports the bishops and the presiding bishop with episcopal formation and development; pastoral care of bishops, their families and diocesan systems; and mediation in Title IV disciplinary matters.High on the list of duties is the College for Bishops, which provides a three-year cycle of training for new bishops, known as Living Our Vows, as well as continuing education for longer-serving bishops. He will continue in his role as the college’s managing director for the next two years. The transition will, he told Episcopal News Service, help the college choose a new leader who will report directly to the presiding bishop.Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley will leave his diocesan post to succeed Matthews as head of the Office of Pastoral Development. He begins work on July 5.During the 2017 session of Living Our Vows, Matthews spoke to ENS about his ministry.What was the greatest challenge you faced in June 1998 when you began in the Office of Pastoral Development?The greatest challenge was living into the breadth of the office while also honoring the hard work of responding to misconduct issues. Misconduct had dominated the last few years of Harold Hopkins’ tenure. Hoppy was having to do everything himself with the election processes, and the College for Bishops was having trouble getting participants into the program. [Presiding Bishop] Frank Griswold wanted to create a pool of consultants for election processes. That would free up time to address the lack of vision and resources for the [five-year-old] College for Bishops. Without consultants, they were canceling more programs than they were actually having, and it was totally supported by outside funding. The general church [budget] was not paying any of it.Bishop F. Clayton MatthewsAge: 70Home: New Bern, North CarolinaEducation: Hampton Sydney College, B.A.; Virginia Theological Seminary. M. Div. and D.D Ordained ministry: 1973 ordained priest; 1985 became canon to the ordinary in Diocese of Virginia; 1993 ordained bishop suffragan in Virginia; 1998 hired as bishop for the Office of Pastoral Development.What were yours and the presiding bishop’s goals for this office when you began? How have those changed, if they have?The goals were, one, to represent the next generation of bishops in the house because at that time I was young. The second was to create trained leaders who could extend the work of the office beyond the individual holding the office. The work is bigger than the person holding the office. The work of those cohorts was as consultants, teachers, therapists for interventions, advisors in Title IV disciplinary matters. None of those groups existed.You have spent nearly 20 years doing this work. How have the issues that bishops face changed?To answer that I have to say a little bit about what happened before 1998. Obviously, the General Convention in 1991 in Phoenix, there was a meltdown within the House of Bishops and there was a toxic environment and an atmosphere of total distrust. It was in response to that, partly, that in 1993 the college had its first embryonic days because it was just absolutely necessary. Then in 1994 the church created its first uniform disciplinary canons. There was also the Lambeth Conference that took place in 1998 [during which] this church felt betrayed by the Archbishop of Canterbury. That was the scene in which I came into.In 1998, we knew we had to deal with the toxic environment. We had to create an atmosphere where there was more respect within the house for the context in which bishops worked. And the college had to change its focus so that more bishops would participate, and so that it was not just for new bishops but for all bishops. So we expanded the program. So we were offering programs such as “the bishop as pastor” or “the bishop as public person” so that any bishop could come to them, not just brand-new bishops. We still do this today.In 2002 and 2003, we were in a period of bishops creating constitutional crises to challenge the church. We had sessions of bishops [meeting] outside of the House of Bishops. We had to create Delegated Episcopal Pastoral Oversight [for Episcopalians who felt their bishops’ stances on some issues meant they could not be their pastors]. And it was also when the college finished a three-year research project with the ELCA [Evangelical Lutheran church in America] on what bishops needed coming into this office.By the time we get to 2008, we’re into property issues; we’re into abandonment of communion by bishops. And we’re into a total reorganization of the College for Bishops to meet the needs of the church. 2009 was the first time the General Convention supported the work of the College for Bishops. It’s also the convention when [many people on the churchwide staff] lost their jobs, so it was a huge matter.By 2013, the atmosphere in the house was much less toxic. Many of the detractors had left the house and formed new churches. It was also the creation of the new Title IV [clergy disciplinary] canons and I became the intake officer for the church [the person designated to receive reports of offenses by bishops]. The work there was overwhelming, just overwhelming because there was no governor on who could make a complaint and what a complaint consisted of. By then, the College for Bishops is robust; it’s in full bloom and functioning quite well with a board. We became incorporated in 2011 by unanimous vote of the House [of Bishops].Now, 2017, it’s time for the next generation and hence to Todd [Ousley]. It’s time for the job description for the bishop of the Office of Pastoral Development to be examined and changed, which it has been. It’s time for college to see what it has in terms of its offerings to this church and to the [Anglican] Communion. It’s a time of exploration.What do you see on the horizon for bishops? What new issues are bubbling up?Bishops are going to have to deal with increased expectations with fewer resources. That is going to be a huge issue. They’re going to be asked to have expertise in areas that are not part of their history. An example of that is support for small congregations. Most bishops do not come from small congregations.And challenge is continued clarity of our corporate – and I don’t mean institutional, I mean whole body – responsibilities, care for one another, the haves and the have-nots.There will also be challenges to our polity.Bishop Clay Matthews, right, listens to Diocese of Massachusetts Bishop Alan Gates during a June 14 Bible study that was part of Living Our Vows, the college’s three-year formation program for new bishops. Retired Bishop Suffragan Terry Dance of the Anglican Church of Canada’s Diocese of Huron, listens as well. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThere seems to be a sense that the members of the House of Bishops are more connected to each other, and that there is less tension in the house. From your perspective, is that the case and, if so, to what do you attribute that change?There’s greater respect for the context in which bishops work, which informs our theology. Beforehand, there was little appreciation for the diversity of this church and therefore little opportunity to understand the theology that grounded some decisions made by bishops based on their contexts, on where they worked and lived. [The House of Bishops] was more a theoretical debate society rather than a sense of understanding ministry on the ground.The biggest disrupter was in 2003 when the House of Bishops gave its consent to the election of Gene Robinson [the first openly gay bishop in the Anglican Communion]. It really tore at the fabric of the house. We had a group of bishops that got up and left. We had bishops who did not give consent but who stayed in the house. They are widely respected but who felt, because of their decision, ostracized. Within that [atmosphere] you had bishops who might have felt one way theologically but had to act another way because of the context in which they were exercising their ministry.It was a very difficult period in 2003, 2004, 2005. It was all focused on the bishops giving consent. The deputies could go home and [for the bishops] it wasn’t quite the same. The bishops had to respond to the reaction of the people of their diocese. Of course, it was on both sides; every diocese, it was on both sides.Today, there’s a greater sense of respect within the house for each other and for what they are having to address at home.What would you like the wider church to know about the work and ministry of bishops?I’d like for them to know or have the opportunity to experience the faithful, prayerful, respect each one has for their call. It goes so much deeper than how they’re seen in the trappings of the office; the faithful Christian trying to be the best bishop they can be for the church, rather than the role.The problem, of course, with that is everybody’s had an experience with the role and they project that experience onto whoever holds the office. That’s one of the things that people who come [to the College for Bishops] to teach and have an experience like this, they can’t stop talking about what a pleasure it is to be able to hear how the bishops handle the content of what we’re trying to do. It’s hard to see when you’ve got somebody up there in these fine vestments that are all kingly and royal. It’s one thing to look at it from the outside; it’s another thing to live it.What advice have you given your successor, Bishop Todd Ousley?Trust his own instincts. Make what I did his own and get rid of the things that he doesn’t think are helpful. Accept the support that others will offer him. Be collaborative. Don’t get caught up in the bureaucracy. For example, when I first came into the office there was consideration of me being the chaplain to the Church Center [staff]. I said no. I have only been to one Executive Council meeting when asked. Don’t get caught up in the bureaucracy of the church so you can do ministry. Be there when they need you, when they want you, but otherwise, you’ve got plenty to do.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is senior editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. This interview was lightly edited for clarity and condensed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Joe Parrish says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Q&A: Bishop F. Clayton Matthews on helping shape the House of Bishops Retiring head of Office for Pastoral Development says, ‘there’s greater respect for context in which bishops work’ Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (1) Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 House of Bishops Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 23, 2017 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH June 24, 2017 at 1:40 pm Seems there is an issue that needs to be addressed, somewhat like the UTO; can the College of Bishops really represent DFMS when it is not an entity under that umbrella. That it is separately organized seems to fly in the face of a unified Episcopal Church. So there will probably be a level of suspicion in its activities until whatever caused it to incorporate separately from DFMS is resolved. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Committee considers social justice theology proposals

first_img July 6, 2018 at 8:17 pm I agree with you PJ. I have been reading throughout this site. Anti Israel, Changing the BCP (discussed two options) It was very apparent the reporting committees bias. Continued to say “for the time being” meaning we might not get the BCP changed this time but it will happen. Changing the Lords Prayer on and on. Maybe, I am cynical but the “big brother” approach of we know whats best for you even though you don’t ” bless your heart” mentality is very concerning. As an ethnic minority who is a conservative “gasp” I have heard this too often from some in the “majority” who think they know what is best for me and my race. “SOP” of some of my liberal brother and sisters. Peace be with all of us Episcopalians! By Mike PattersonPosted Jul 6, 2018 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA PJ Cabbiness says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (17) Rector Albany, NY Jane Scott says: July 6, 2018 at 7:22 pm Are we a church or a leftist political action organization? The lines are becoming blurred. Billy Beets says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Jerry Williams says: [Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] How does social justice fit into the mission and ministry of the Episcopal Church? This is the question a proposed resolution presented during the 79th General Convention would seek to understand.Resolution A056 asks that the General Convention direct the presiding officers of the Episcopal Church to appoint a Task Force on the Theology of Social Justice Advocacy as Christian Justice. If approved and implemented, the task force, over the next triennium, would consider scripture, approved liturgical resources, other theological texts and previous actions of General Convention to summarize ways the church understands social justice as an essential mission and ministry.The resolution also calls for the task force to study how the church currently fosters the theological understanding of social justice and asks it to recommend ways to foster conversations on social justice across the church.The convention’s Ministry Committee on July 6 heard three speakers in favor of the resolution.Full ENS coverage of the 79th meeting of General Convention is available here.The Rev. Kenneth Brannon, Idaho deputy and member of the Ministry Committee, questioned the need for a establishing a task force when churches are already involved in addressing social justice issues. “Social justice is front and center to what we do in the Episcopal Church,” he said.Responding to his question, the Rev. Tracie Middleton, Fort Worth deputy and a board member of the Association of Episcopal Deacons, said that a theology of social justice could eventually lead to more resources on how congregations might tackle social justice issues. “There is an urgent demand for how we do it,” she said.In an interview after the hearing, Middleton said clergy might be aware of only a few of the social justice issues that parishioners are passionate about. The ability to have a resource network across the country to share ideas and knowledge would be beneficial by bringing priests and deacons up to speed on the myriad social justice issues their parishioners care most about.The resolution asks that the General Convention request the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance to consider budgeting $15,000 to implement the resolution.The resolution was proposed by the House of Deputies’ Committee on the State of the Church. In its Blue Book Report, the committee concluded that while the church is “doing many different types of work, social justice work is not robust across the church.”Most especially, the committee discovered that the understanding of “social justice” varies broadly and that activities across the church tend to fall more “into the realm of alleviation of suffering and the work of charity than the work of justice.”The task force said this distinction caused “anxiety” for some who completed a survey, “both in terms of trying to define charity work as ‘justice’ and from some who do not believe the church should be doing justice work.” Some survey respondents replied that the church should “remove itself from politics and get on the work of social justice.”“We heard concerns that social justice is ‘only about politics,’” the task force reported.The task force also heard about “a sense of being disconnected from the words of the wider church and General Convention on the theology of social justice.” It said, “Some felt that social justice preaching should not advocate a particular view on reform or that the emphasis should be on ‘outreach ministry’ but not social justice.”Respondents to a survey conducted for the committee were eager for resources, suggestions and people to reach for help, and “almost all who responded acknowledged a need for this work and many a desire to do it. They wanted to connect with others doing this work but did not know how to find them.”To clarify misunderstandings, the committee defined social justice work as “acts to address and heal the root cause of the injustice which prompted our need for charity in the first place.”“In our churchwide discussions,” the task force report stated, “we talk about justice in terms of promoting social change and responding to long-term needs in combination with work to alleviate the suffering before us.”– Mike Patterson is a San Antonio-based freelance writer and correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. He is a member of ENS General Convention reporting team and can be reached at [email protected] July 7, 2018 at 12:05 pm One of the important aspects of social justice is its role in spiritual formation. I think social justice needs to be framed within a context of spiritual formation as does compassion and love which I see are the constant goals toward which spiritual formation aspires. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Frank Harrision says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention 2018 Nancy Brown says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Committee considers social justice theology proposals Rector Knoxville, TN July 7, 2018 at 1:52 am Was it Dom Helder Camarra who said,“When I found ways to help feed the poor, they called me a saint.When I asked why the poor were hungry, they called me a Communist.” July 8, 2018 at 10:25 am Like it or not, you are locked in as an arm of the Democrat Party. If the gender of Jesus and his Father is somehow offensive, there will be no hesitation to suppress and demean ideas from the “other” and those who introduce them. The church has been subsumed. Track the calls for political action. Is there any difference from the party talking points in content and timing ? If you are Democrat, it is a great idea, and very well done. If the church is leading, fine. If the church is a tool, somebody sold us out. Claiming your political goals have “God on our side” leaves one open to be manipulated by politicos and cheapens the faith that should be guiding us independent of the politicians. Control the language, control the people. “Social Justice”, you are well on your way. Remove the terms associated with traditional faith, he, him, father, son. Smooth. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 July 12, 2018 at 4:21 pm What of those Episcopalians who, for sound reasons, do not accept the Jesus Movement or want to be a part of it? Does the inclusiveness of The Church embrace them without ranker? From what I read and hear, I doubt that very much. July 11, 2018 at 7:39 am The term “social justice” is an ambiguous term and can mean different things to different people so its difficult to determine where the church is coming from. If it means we should be helping the less fortunate in our community then I totally agree with that. No one should be hungry, cold or without shelter. We should be helping people to “get on their feet” and in a position to support themselves and not remain wards of the welfare state indefinitely.When the church speaks of “social justice” does it really mean socialism, “what’s your’s is mine” mentality. “You work I take.”. If that’s the case then the church simply a shill for the left. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 7, 2018 at 3:05 pm Unfortunately, the term “social justice” is identified with radical progressive politics, whatever its origins. Political alignment with one party, even with its jargon, immediately divides people. Jesus gave us the universal blueprint and terminology to address our challenges. What would be the reaction if the church adopted “Make the Episcopal Church Great Again! “? The term social justice has come to denote a sense of class warfare. Who makes the decision as to what political programs are good or not ? Where does that decision come from ? Are these decisions to call for political action most often aligned with one party or another ? Is there ever a call to action to support another party ? How soon after a political call to action by one party does this church echo that call ? It might seem right within the bubble of your peers, but the answer is in the “other” that you may be alienating. Submit a Job Listing Jerry Williams says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Michael Fitzpatrick says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bill Louis says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY July 12, 2018 at 4:28 pm How true. July 7, 2018 at 9:27 am As a denomination, we are really good at charity, but I know very few Episcopalians, lay and ordained, who are doing social justice work. I think it’s a balancing act that is almost impossible to navigate. We are called to alleviate the suffering of our sisters and brothers, but developing effective social justice efforts is playing the long game. We want quick, easy, feel good work, so feeding to homeless is mistaken for social justice. I would welcome this networking effort as a means of connecting resources across the church and helping educate the church on what social justice truly is. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Frank Harrision says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 July 6, 2018 at 8:57 pm The House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church was bold and truthful in stating “social justice work is not robust across the Church.” That may be the greatest understatement in the Blue Book. Social justice work is not on the agenda of most Episcopal churches. Clergy know they will hear cries of “Keep politics out of the Church” if they advocate working to change unjust practices. Even in progressive parishes the number of members who turn out for this vital work is small relative to the size of the congregation. To remedy this situation should be a number one priority of the Episcopal Church. Bishops need to give bold leadership, clergy need to be trained, challenged, and encouraged; and the laity must be recognized and applauded for their efforts. If we truly are part of the Jesus Movement, we must show neighbor love by exposing unjust practices and working to remove them. A budget of $15,000 for creating a network to share ideas and knowledge will not solve the problem, but it may help spread awareness of what needs to be done and the creative, disciplined work for justice being done in some places. Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. July 8, 2018 at 11:08 pm The gospel message of Jesus very much includes the concept of social justice.Who defines it? Easiest question yet.Jesus already has.If you’re supporting a political party that’s out of touch with his message,change parties instead of blaming the Church for following His teachings General Convention, Debra Aring says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN July 7, 2018 at 11:29 am That exactly pinpoints the problem. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 7, 2018 at 3:44 pm I’m in favor of more active social justice work by the Church, locally and nationally, but it needs to be Bible driven first. The only way we can honestly answer the charge that we’re an arm of the Democratic Party is if we recognize that the Christian vision is far more radical than anything American liberals have ever dreamed of. Imagine a Church that ignores national politics altogether, and instead envisions a social justice campaign built on the bulwark of scripture and the rich Anglican legacy of social justice concern. We could turn the world upside down (in other words, see more and more of the Kingdom of Heaven come to earth). Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events July 6, 2018 at 10:19 pm Social justice may use politics to legally rectify an injustice but any comparison ends there. Studying, identifying and working to overcome social injustice seem synonymous to me to carry out “and love thy neighbor as thyself”, the second of the two commandments upon which Christ said “hang all the law and the prophets.”As a lay person I would surely appreciate knowing where those working in this area have felt productive and I would like to know how I can help. It seems reasonable and responsive at the national and diocesan level to study, research, write about, and inform us parishioners first about social injustice and then simultaneously illustrate what’s working using both religious and secular methods to ensure fairness in our neighborhoods, schools, courts, stretching at every step to include our nation. July 12, 2018 at 4:25 pm You may think that this is a silly question. Nonetheless, people in the Red Cross and other secular organizations seek social justice. What is the difference, if any, between an Episcopalian doing this and, say, on the other hand, a member of a secular atheistic, or at least non-religions, organization? Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Steve Price says: Karen Burr McKee says: Tags M. J. Wise says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Arthur Lee says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 7, 2018 at 10:03 am I’m fine with a focus on social justice so much as it coincides with individual justice. When social justice violates an individual’s right to justice, that’s a problem. Social justice seems designed to stratify us into competing groups and some groups will just have to lose so some larger social justice goals can be met. That’s certainly not what Jesus preached. Jesus proclaimed salvation for each and every individual, not salvation for certain groups. Frank Harrision says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

Episcopal Church in Montana announces slate of bishop candidates

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ House of Bishops, Bishop Elections, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA [Episcopal Church in Montana] The Standing Committee of the Episcopal Church in Montana announced  on May 1 a slate of three candidates for the 10th bishop of the diocese.The Rev. Mary CaucuttBishop Franklin Brookhart retired on Oct. 31, 2018. The candidates to succeed Brookhart, in alphabetical order, are:The Rev. Mary Caucutt, rector of Christ Church in Cody, Wyoming.The Rev. Nina Ranadive Pooley, rector of St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church in Yarmouth, Maine.The Rev. Marty Elizabeth Stebbins, rector of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Wilson, North Carolina.The Rev. Nina Ranadive PooleyThe Standing Committee received and approved the slate of candidates by unanimous vote in a closed-door session on April 16. The approval of the slate is the culmination of a process that began in July 2018, when Brookhart’s retirement plans were announced, and elections were held to form a Nominating Committee to lead the process of discerning and proposing candidates for bishop.The Nominating Committee, under the leadership of Keith Kuhn as chair, conducted listening sessions in every parish in the diocese, conducted a full survey, met regularly and worked hard to bring a strong slate to the diocese.The Rev. Marty StebbinsDetailed information on the individual candidates can be found on the diocesan website.Candidates for bishop still may be added to the final slate through a petition process, the details of which may be found on the diocesan website. Nominations by petition may be filed until 5 p.m. MDT May 15.The electing convention will take place on July 26 at First Presbyterian Church in Bozeman. The service of ordination and consecration is scheduled for Dec. 7 at St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Helena.The Episcopal Church in Montana encompasses 33 congregations across the Big Sky state. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Posted May 1, 2019 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church in Montana announces slate of bishop candidates Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Women’s Ministry Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, ILlast_img read more