Latest: West Ham 2 QPR 0 – Hammers heading for resounding derby win

first_imgDiafra Sakho’s second-half goal left QPR staring at another defeat.Nedum Onuoha’s own goal gave West Ham an early lead in what has been a one-sided derby.The defender, brought in at the expense of Mauricio Isla at right-back, nudged Stewart Downing’s fifth-minute corner into the net under pressure from Sakho.And Sakho netted just before the hour mark, adding the finishing touch from a yard out after Rangers had failed to clear their lines and James Tomkins was able to hold off Rio Ferdinand and hook the ball over keeper Rob Green.Rangers, bottom of the table and having been beaten in all four of their away games this season, have been poor at the back again.After conceding the opening goal they were fortunate not to go further behind when Enner Valencia shot wide from 10 yards out after being found by Sakho’s low cross.Still without the injured Joey Barton, the visitors offered little until Charlie Auston created a chance for himself.The striker poked the ball through Tomkins’ legs as he collected a pass from R’s left-back Armand Traore, but could not steer his side-footed shot past keeper Adrian with an unmarked Niko Kranjcar available to his right.It has so far been unhappy return to Upton Park for Ferdinand, Green and Rangers boss Harry Redknapp, who sent another former West Ham man, Bobby Zamora, on at half-time.Zamora made an immediate impression, finding space on the left and crossing for Austin, who fired wide.But Rangers were unable to maintain their early second-half pressure and more shoddy defending led to them going further behind.The hosts then thought they had scored a third when Green inexplicably passed a goal-kick straight to Valencia, who gratefully netted only for the goal to be disallowed because the Hammers striker was not the requisite 10 yards away from the ball.QPR (4-2-3-1): Green, Onuoha, Ferdinand, Caulker, Traore, Sandro (Taarabt 66), Henry, Fer, Hoilett (Zamora 45), Kranjcar (Mutch 77), Austin. Subs: McCarthy, Isla, Dunne, Vargas.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

House Passes NIDS Bill

first_imgStory Highlights The Prime Minister also cited Clause 41, which requires citizens to present their national identification (ID) number/card in order to receive goods or services from any public body. Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, in his remarks before the passage of the Bill, sought to allay concerns regarding the enrolment of persons and the penalties for those who do not comply. The House of Representatives on Tuesday (November 21) approved the 168 amendments made by the Senate to the National Identification and Registration Bill, which seeks to establish a reliable identification system for Jamaica.A National Identification System (NIDS) is intended to provide a comprehensive and secure structure to enable the capture and storage of identity information for all Jamaicans.Each citizen will be provided with a randomised nine-digit National Identification Number (NIN), which they will have for life.Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, in his remarks before the passage of the Bill, sought to allay concerns regarding the enrolment of persons and the penalties for those who do not comply.He noted that there is a maximum fine of $100,000, “but the judge can use their discretion, and I am expecting that the judge would. We have removed the option of imprisonment, totally removed it,” he said.The Prime Minister also cited Clause 41, which requires citizens to present their national identification (ID) number/card in order to receive goods or services from any public body.Mr. Holness argued that currently, persons have to present an ID to get any service from the Government.“But we have made sure to write in a protection in the event of health or something that is life-threatening or a natural disaster or a national emergency. Then, the system of presenting a national identification card would be suspended. So, we are not here trying to deprive the citizens of Jamaica of their rights,” he pointed out.“We cannot continue to look at the Jamaican State as the enemy of the people. I am not the enemy of the people, and it is time that we reject that idea. Yes, there must be strong voices to ensure that Government does not go astray, but we cannot start on the assumption that when we stand here to pass legislation we are passing legislation to deprive people of rights,” the Prime Minister added.The layered roll-out and management of the NIDS will be handled by a new agency, the National Identification and Registration Authority (NIRA), which will replace the Registrar General’s Department (RGD) and provide more enhanced services.Roll-out of NIDS is slated to begin with a pilot project in January 2019, focusing on civil servants. The House of Representatives on Tuesday (November 21) approved the 168 amendments made by the Senate to the National Identification and Registration Bill, which seeks to establish a reliable identification system for Jamaica.last_img read more

DryShips Secures Time Charter for Newcastlemax

first_imgzoom Greece-based ship owner DryShips Inc. has entered into a one year time charter with a major grain house for one of its 206,000 dwt Newcastlemax drybulk vessels.A total gross backlog of USD 7.1 million is expected from the contract, which is scheduled to commence upon the delivery of the vessel before the end of April 2017.“We are very pleased to have employed one of our newly acquired vessels upon its delivery, at a gross charter rate, which will be highly accretive to the company’s earnings and will provide visible cash flow,” George Economou, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, said.The company did not disclose the name of the vessel in question.According to data provided by VesselsValue, DryShips recently purchased four such dry bulkers, namely the 2013-built Moritz Oldendorff and Valley Star, the 2014-built Super Star and the 2015-built Wish Star.World Maritime News contacted DryShips for details on the vessel related to the charter deal, however, the company is yet to reply.“We continue to execute our strategy to restore the company’s earnings capacity, taking advantage of the positive developments in the drybulk market,” Economou added.last_img read more

Government emails contradict Liberal claims on fate of First Nation education dollars

first_imgEarlier that same day, an Aboriginal Affairs spokesperson emailed APTN a response from department bureaucrats on the First Nation education money confirming $1.2 billion still existed on the books.“The remaining funds are still available,” said spokesperson Amanda Gordon, who was in the office of former Aboriginal affairs minister Bernard Valcourt, in an Oct. 2, 2015, email.Months earlier in April during the lock-up for what would prove to be the last Harper federal budget, a federal Finance official repeatedly stated the $1.2 billion for First Nation education remained on the books in the “fiscal framework.”The $1.2 billion figure was what was left over from the $1.9 billion the Harper government tied to passage of the controversial First Nation Control of First Nation Education Act which was rejected in 2014 by First Nation chiefs.The Harper government said at the time the money would only flow if the Assembly of First Nations supported the bill.Knowing education to be a sore political spot in the relationship between First Nations and the Harper government, the Liberals jumped out early with the $2.6 billion education promise which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau unveiled on the campaign trail last August.The NDP pounced, accusing the Liberals of making a promise based on money that did not exist.A close inspection of the promise revealed the Liberals were really only committing $900 million in new money which would be added to $1.7 billion the party believed the Conservatives had set aside for education.The Liberals, it seems, made a big assumption in their promise. A large chunk of the promised money, about $500 million, came from a 4.5 per cent escalator in education funding the Conservatives also tied to passage of the ill-fated legislation on education.As the record shows, only $1.2 billion was ever set aside for First Nation education. It remains unclear why the Liberals chose to base their election education promise on money that was never there.Now it seems the Liberal government is trying to prepare the groundwork ahead of the next federal budget which may contain education funding that won’t match what was promised by the party to First Nation students on the campaign trail.APTN contacted Finance Minister Bill Morneau and Bennett’s office seeking clarification on the contradictions between the record and the statement by the Indigenous Affairs minister.A spokesperson for Finance said in an emailed statement that there was now only $241 million left in the fiscal framework.“In budget 2015 much of this provisioned allocation was removed, but not announced,” said David Barnabe, a spokesperson for the department.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarrera Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsIndigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett’s claim the previous Conservative government spent all the money set aside for First Nation education—leaving her government in a hole when it comes to fulfilling its $2.6 billion promise on the issue—is not supported by the record.Bennett said in the House of Commons during question period Friday the previous Conservative government of Stephen Harper “removed” money set aside for First Nation education from the federal Finance department’s books.After repeatedly dodging APTN’s questions on the issue, Bennett finally admitted the money on which the Liberals based their $2.6 billion election education promise doesn’t exist.“Sadly, I can confirm that the previous government removed the promised additional funding for first nations education that it had promised,” said Bennett, responding to questions from the NDP on the issue. “I am saddened by that revelation, but we are committed to making the appropriate investments to close that gap.”However, the minister’s claim it’s the Conservative’s fault contradicts information supplied to APTN by Finance and Aboriginal Affairs (as the department was known at the time) officials in October, near the end of last year’s federal campaign.Those departments stated there was $1.2 billion set aside in the books for First Nation education, but it would be up to the next federal government to decide what to do with the money.“The funds remain in the fiscal framework. Following the federal election, the government will determine the best use of these funds,” said Stephanie Rubec, a spokesperson for the Department of Finance, in an Oct. 2, 2015, email.Click to enlarge screenshot of emailslast_img read more

Fuel theft poses first big battle for Mexican president

first_imgMEXICO CITY — Mexico’s new president has shut down some pipelines to stop fuel thieves who he says had established an illegal distribution network.The fight against thefts of $3 billion per year from government pipelines and fuel depots represents the first big domestic battle for Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who took office on Dec. 1.Lopez Obrador said Monday that some gangs had actually built warehouses over pipeline rights of way to drill illegal taps into the ducts.The pipeline shutdowns and a temporary switch to more distribution by tanker trucks has caused gasoline shortages in a handful of states.Despite the political costs of the shortages, Lopez Obrador said he will not fold, noting “let’s see who gets tired first, the fuel thieves or us.”The Associated Presslast_img read more

Fire Fighters matching donations made to help family fighting cancer

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Professional Fire Fighters will match donations up to $5,000 for 4-year-old Natalie who was diagnosed with Stage 4 Neuroblastoma.In a post on Facebook, the group said they would match up to $5,000 with a goal of raising $10,000 to help Natalie’s family with the cost of travelling to Vancouver during her treatment.  A GoFundMe campaign was also created for the family but is only halfway to the $20,000 goal.Donations made to the Professional Fire Fighters Charitable Society can receive a tax receipt.  To make a donation, contact Adam at 250-264-2857 or call the Fire Department at 250-785-4333. Several groups and residents created fundraisers for Natalie in December to also help the family.  The Professional Fire Fighters Charitable Society also made a sizeable donation at that time.The Fire Fighters also shared the following update from Natalie’s mother.“Natalie has recently started round 4 chemo, and is tolerating things quite well. Most days her energy level and appetite are back full force. She is well on her way to finishing the first part of the treatment plan which consists of 2 more rounds of chemo and a major surgery to remove her main tumour between her liver and kidney. After that point, we are moving into the second phase which is bone marrow transplants, and radiation. As a family we are doing ok with things, she misses her sisters and misses mom when I am back in FSJ with the other two girls. They haven’t seen her yet but hopefully, we can get them down there soon to visit unfortunately the cost of extra medications and living down there is proving to be a bit challenging without the weight of flights added as well. All in all, she is an incredibly strong-willed child and is starting to come back to her normal self which we are all grateful for no less! “last_img read more

What to Watch For in the NBA Finals

For all the talk this season about conference imbalance in the NBA and the inequity of its playoff structure, things seemed to have worked out just fine. Measured by point differential, we’ve ended up with the best teams from the Eastern and Western Conferences in the finals, and fans everywhere get the chance to watch a rarity in pro basketball: an NBA Finals rematch.Who’s going to win? The old adage is that defense wins championships, but this matchup is all about the offenses.The San Antonio Spurs and the Miami Heat have had the two best offenses in these playoffs and, surprisingly, both have been more efficient than they were in the regular season. Their offensive systems are different, but they have the same basic goal: Create good shots. With that in mind, here are some things to watch for:Spurs movementIn April, a study by two members of the Harvard Sports Analysis Collective found that, after controlling for time of possession, the Spurs’ offense had more movement and more passing than any other offense in the league, and by a wide margin. Indeed, according to the NBA’s SportVU Player Tracking Statistics, the Spurs’ offense has featured more movement during the playoffs than the other three conference finalists.Movement Per Minute of PossessionPassing and ball movement are not perfect proxies for offensive effectiveness, but in the Spurs’ case, they are symptomatic of an offense that is working well. San Antonio doesn’t have any player as individually brilliant as Miami’s LeBron James to consistently pull good shots out of thin air, so the Spurs rely on their collaborative system. The distance traveled is of particular importance. On average, the five players on the floor for the Spurs cumulatively travel nearly 500 feet farther per minute of possession than the players for the Heat. That’s 500 extra feet of screening, rolling and cutting, searching for seams in the defense and open space on the perimeter.The Heat’s defense plays at a frenetic pace, aggressively trapping pick-and-roll ball-handlers and flying around the perimeter in a series of rotations to cover shooters. It can be devastating when done well, but the Spurs are uniquely suited to turn this aggression against the Heat.Shot selectionWhile a key indicator of the Spurs’ offensive health is the movement and passing they use to create shots, the key for the Heat is simply the location of their shots.The Heat spent most of the past two weeks burying the Pacers with 3-pointers. These outside shots buoy Miami’s offensive efficiency, but the Heat’s 3-point shooting is also a reflection of how easily James, Dwyane Wade and the Heat’s other ball-handlers get into the lane and collapse the opponent’s defense.In his NBA Finals’ preview at Grantland, Zach Lowe pointed out some of the methods the Spurs used to defend the Heat in last year’s playoffs, and how they resulted in a slew of mid-range jump shots. If we look at the breakdown of the Heat’s true shot attempts (which includes field goal attempts and trips to the free-throw line) we can see just how far last year’s pattern was from what the Heat have just done.Miami Heat Shot SelectionFor the Heat, 3-point attempts are tied to their ability to get inside the defense. James, Wade, Norris Cole and Mario Chalmers were able to get into the lane with ease against the Pacers in the Eastern Conference finals, and the result was that nearly 30 percent of Miami’s true shot attempts in that series were 3-pointers (which they made at an obscene 40.8 percent clip).In last year’s finals, however, by walling off the paint and offering up mid-range jump shots to the Heat, the Spurs were able to keep them away from the rim, off the free-throw line and inside the 3-point line. The Heat will surely have some adjustments ready this year, and we should be able to tell a lot about how they are working just by looking at the locations of their shots.LineupsThe offensive systems each team employs to create good shots revolve around lineups. The Heat would prefer to play small, arraying three and sometimes four shooters around James. The Pacers were loathe to change gears and try to match up with them, but the Spurs may be more willing. They have more depth than any of the teams the Heat have played in these playoffs, and San Antonio is much more comfortable using that depth in a variety of arrangements.A big issue in last season’s finals’ matchup was the way the Heat’s small lineups forced the Spurs to separate Tiago Splitter and Tim Duncan. The Spurs used that pairing for about 20 percent of their regular-season minutes, then just over 11 percent in the finals. But Spurs’ coach Gregg Popovich has been more aggressive this season about experimenting with different lineups.It is tricky to parse statistics for the Spurs between big and small lineups because of the big and small skill set of Boris Diaw. When he’s playing power forward for the Spurs, the “big” or “small” nature of the lineup depends on the matchups and what he’s being asked to do. But having him on the floor allows the Spurs to have their cake and eat it, too.Back to the NBA’s SportVU Player Tracking Statistics: Diaw was third on the team in touches per game, at 49.2, during the regular season. While Diaw is capable of scoring in a variety of ways, he averaged just 9.1 points per game because his role in the Spurs’ offense often called for him to be a facilitator. He averaged 38.9 passes per game; about 79 percent of his touches involved moving the ball to another player. This usually worked out well for the Spurs, as Diaw is among the best big man passers in the game. His assists created an additional 6.7 points per game for the Spurs during the regular season.In the Spurs’ Game 6 victory to close out the Oklahoma City Thunder, Diaw saw a lot of extra touches by virtue of playing some extra minutes, but it was what he did with those touches that made the difference.The Boris Diaw StoryIn Game 6, Diaw’s touches accumulated nearly 50 percent more points for the Spurs than they did during the regular season or in the series to this point. This increased output from Diaw was needed, with the Spurs struggling to hit 3-pointers and Tony Parker sitting out the second half with an ankle injury.Diaw’s ability to shift between big and small defensive assignments, and scoring and facilitating roles on offense, may allow the Spurs to sidestep a lot of the matchup land mines the Heat have waiting for them.MarginsThese teams are incredibly talented, well-coached and, ultimately, evenly matched. Each has a series of counters available for every obvious advantage the other will try to exploit. That’s why this series will be won at the margins and in the minutiae. Little things — the Spurs forcing the Heat to make one extra defensive rotation, the Heat getting the ball to a 3-point shooter instead of settling for a seemingly open jump shot around the free-throw line, and the tiny in-game matchups that shift the rotations — will be the deciding battles. read more

Ruling is further evidence of NCAA tightening stranglehold on college athletes

If “Tattoogate” has truly resulted in any inking, it’s colored Ohio State’s student-athletes black and blue — by the NCAA. The NCAA’s ruling has put OSU’s hopes for a strong run next season into jeopardy. It not only forces five impact players to sit out the first five games of the season — including non-conference games at home against Colorado and on the road against Miami (Fla.) — but also has seemingly put the early nails in the coffin for  quarterback Terrelle Pryor’s Heisman campaign next season. In fact, the ruling suddenly has diminished Pryor’s prospects for even returning to the gridiron his senior season. Despite all that, the bigger issue involved here is the NCAA hammering its soulless, iron fist. In what’s now being called “Tattoogate,” five OSU football players — Pryor, Daniel “Boom” Herron, Mike Adams, DeVier Posey and Solomon Thomas — must sit the first five games of the 2010–11 football season and repay between $1,000 and $2,500 to charity. All because they sold their personal belongings and traded autographs for tattoos. None of these players was taking payouts from agents, receiving free Hummers or partying on private yachts with rappers. Instead, Pryor sold his things to help out his mother, Pryor’s high school coach Ray Reitz told ESPN. The reality of life is that sometimes people need to sell their things to get by, even if they’re cherished. We don’t know what sentimental value these players placed on the rings, awards and jerseys they sold, but if these players truly were in financial need, is it really appropriate for the NCAA to punish them so harshly? Few people actually want to sell their wedding ring, but sometimes it’s necessary to help make ends meet. Buckeye fans might feel a little stung that Pryor sold a Big Ten championship ring and his Gold Pants, but if Pryor truly was trying to help out his family, can we really be that upset with him? And is trading a tattoo for an autograph really so bad? It’s not like these players were trading tattoos for an all-expense-paid vacation to a party at the Playboy Mansion. Erik Kuselias of ESPN’s “Mike & Mike in the Morning” makes a good point: These athletes can receive hundreds of dollars in free merchandise for playing in the Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl, but trading an autograph for a tattoo is worthy of a five-game suspension? Great logic, NCAA. Great logic. Let’s not forget the NCAA’s inconsistency, either. Earlier this year, the NCAA ruled that Auburn quarterback Cam Newton was eligible to play, despite reports that his father was shopping him around to universities for six-figure payouts. However, according to the NCAA, an investigation is still ongoing. The NCAA also took several years to reach a verdict in the Reggie Bush case at USC, where Bush received $300,000 in illegal benefits. Bush played at USC from 2003-05, and it wasn’t until June 2010 that the NCAA placed the program on four years probation, forced them to vacate victories and stripped them of scholarships. Being angry with these players for making a mistake might not be the best way to direct our aggression. Instead, we should be more upset with the NCAA for its ridiculous stranglehold on the lives of student-athletes. We should also push the OSU athletic department to educate student-athletes more thoroughly on rules violations. Athletic director Gene Smith even admitted Thursday in a statement that OSU didn’t do a sufficient job educating its student-athletes about these types of violations. And remember that report in The Lantern saying that OSU has an allocation of about $500,000 set aside to help student-athletes in financial need? Perhaps OSU should do a better job of letting these players know they aren’t going to be totally hung out to dry if their wallets are running on empty. It’s not known for sure what the intentions of the players were yet or what the money was spent on, but if the players truly had only good intentions, the NCAA’s ruling is just another case of the NCAA exploiting its embarrassing and illogical stranglehold on each and every move student-athletes make. read more

Ohio State earns bid to Orange Bowl set to play Clemson

Coach Urban Meyer and the football team wait to enter the stadium. OSU lost to Michigan State, 34-24, at the Big Ten Championship at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis Dec. 7. Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editorThe Ohio State Buckeyes are headed to the Sunshine State.One day after getting their dreams of playing for a BCS National Championship dashed by No. 4 Michigan State in the Big Ten Championship game, OSU is set to travel to Miami, Fla., to take on the No. 12 Clemson Tigers (10-2, 7-1) in the Discover Orange Bowl Jan. 3, 2014 after earning an at-large bid.“On behalf of our players, staff and The Ohio State University, we are honored to accept the invitation to play in the Discover Orange Bowl,” OSU coach Urban Meyer said Sunday evening on the Orange Bowl teleconference. “We look forward to representing Ohio State down in south Florida.”The Buckeyes (12-1, 8-1) dropped to No. 7 in the BCS Standings after falling to the Spartans, 34-24, Saturday. With a win, OSU likely would have had a chance to face off against No. 1 Florida State in Pasadena, Calif., but instead are scheduled to play in another BCS bowl against an ACC opponent.Meyer said he did not meet with the team Sunday, and that he does not think the team will have any problems getting up to play Clemson after missing out on a chance to play for the national title.“We had a good conversation after the game last night,” Meyer said. “They’re heartbroken, but they’re also competitors and I think the fact that they’re playing in a BCS Bowl against Clemson, that’s going to wake you up real fast … There’s not doubt in my mind that we’ll be excited to go play in this bowl game.”It is the ninth time OSU has been selected to play in a BCS bowl, tied for the all-time ever with Oklahoma, according to a press release.The Tigers and Buckeyes have only met one other time, in the 1978 Gator Bowl, a memorable affair that cost former OSU coach Woody Hayes his job.Trailing 17-15 with just over two minutes remaining, OSU quarterback Art Schlichter was intercepted by Clemson’s Charlie Bauman to all but end the game. Following the play, Hayes punched Bauman through the face mask after he got up on the OSU sideline.Hayes was fired by OSU the next day.The 2013 version of the Tigers, who lost in their regular season finale Nov. 30 to then-No. 10 South Carolina 31-17, sport a high-powered offense, ranked 12th in the country with 502.9 yards per game. Led by senior quarterback Tajh Boyd, the Tigers are tied for 11th in the country in scoring at 40.2 points per game.OSU junior linebacker Ryan Shazier, who is from Pompano Beach, Fla., said it will be nice to play the final game of the season in his home state.“It will be really cool to be able to play Clemson in Florida in the Orange Bowl game … in front of my family and friends,” Shazier said in an OSU press release. “It will be nice to be able to play the last game of the season in my home state. It will mean a lot.”Buckeye senior left tackle Jack Mewhort said he has not yet turned his thoughts to the bowl game, but said he is going to enjoy getting the opportunity to play in a BCS bowl in his final game at OSU.“I think it means a lot for us to go back and play in a BCS bowl game,” Mewhort said in the release. “To get a win in a big time bowl and at the same time show some resiliency would be a great way to go out. I couldn’t ask at this point for anything more than to play in a BCS bowl game, and getting to go to battle with these guys I’ve been fortunate to play with for the last four or five years will be great.”Kickoff between the Buckeyes and Tigers is set for 8:30 p.m. at Sun Life Stadium. read more

Deschamps Tactical changes were key to France win

first_imgFrance boss Didier Deschamps said that the tactical changes he made in the first-half had a key impact on his forwards in their 2-1 win over GermanyLes Bleus bounced back from Toni Kroos’ 14th-minute penalty to claim all three points in their Nations League clash with Germany after a brace from Antoine Griezmann in the second-half.It’s France’s 11th win in their last 15 matches and one more against the Netherlands at Rotterdam next month will secure them the top spot in Group A1.Speaking after the win at Paris, Deschamps praised the reaction of his players following a difficult opening 45 minutes and reflected on the changes he made during the game.“There was a reaction and we upped the intensity and tempo. The Germans played with real intensity in the first half,” said Deschamps on the UEFA website.“I modified my tactics after 25-30 minutes and found a better balance that gave more freedom to my forwards, especially Kylian (Mbappe) and Antoine (Griezmann) on the wings.Top 5 Bundesliga players to watch during the weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Bundesliga’s Top 5 players to watch next weekend.The German…“It’s a good thing in terms of our aim of finishing top of the group, but we were up against a very good German side today.”France lead Group A1 with seven points from three games.#FRAALL 🇫🇷 2-1 🇩🇪 #NationsLeagueLe fait/homme du match, c’est _________. pic.twitter.com/ciFUWazno6— UEFA Nations League (@EURO2020) October 16, 2018last_img read more