Bihar topper scam: mastermind’s bail quashed

first_imgThe Supreme Court on Thursday quashed the Patna High Court’s order granting conditional bail to Amit Kumar alias Bachcha Rai, the alleged mastermind of the Bihar intermediate topper scam. A Bench of Justices N.V. Ramana and P.C. Pant observed it was “not advisable” to release Rai on bail at this stage. Rai, one of the alleged masterminds of the scam, was arrested on June 11, 2016. The SIT, constituted to probe the scam, had chargesheeted against 32 accused, including Rai.last_img

Rajasthan tables Criminal Laws Amendment Bill amid uproar

first_imgIt will check motivated complaints: Law Minister Amid uproar from the Opposition Congress, Rajasthan Home Minister Gulabchand Kataria on Monday tabled in the Assembly a Bill to replace the ordinance to protect serving and former judges, magistrates and public servants from being investigated for on-duty action without government sanction.The Criminal Laws (Rajasthan Amendment) Bill, 2017, seeks to replace the September 7 ordinance, which drew widespread criticism. The ordinance also barred the media from reporting on accusations of such wrongdoings till the government sanctions a probe. Also Read  Congress members staged a walkout. BJP MLA Ghanshayam Tiwari, who had opposed the ordinance, walked out twice after he was not allowed by Speaker Kailash Meghwal to raise a point of order. After the Bill was tabled, Independent MLA Manik Chand Surana opposed it through a point of order, arguing that there was no prior sanction of the President to the Bill which was circulated among the members on Sunday night. Mr. Surana called the Bill a kaala kanoon (a black law), accused the government of trying to impose an undeclared emergency through it and asserted that the Opposition would not allow a debate without the President’s sanction. Responding to Mr. Surana, the Home Minister said the merits and demerits of the Bill would be discussed during the debate and it would become a law only after it was passed by the House.last_img read more

Goa Cong. wants longer monsoon session

first_imgThe Congress in Goa on Monday decided to ask the Speaker to extend the monsoon session of the Assembly from the 12 days to 18. The session on July 19 has been curtailed to 12 days owing to the illness of Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar.“We agreed with the BJP to curtail the budget session by more than a week, because of the CM’s illness. Since the CM is now attending office, we are going to ask the Speaker to extend this sitting because issues like mining ban, corruption, and infrastructure need to be discussed,” Congress MLA Chandrakant Kavlekar said. Mr. Kavlekar said the demand will also be raised at the business advisory committee meeting ahead of the session. The budget session in March had to be cut short after Mr. Parrikar fell ill, and the BJP requested the Opposition to wind up the session early.last_img read more

Happiness in the air — a green lung space from a big heart

first_imgProsperity is a pre-condition to charity. But between the two lies the connector and facilitator called generosity, an essential. A small entrepreneur in Bhawanipatna, district headquarters town of Odisha’s Kalahandi, has converted his 12-acre farm into a park where the general public enjoy unhindered access.50-year-old Pramod Khamari, a businessman running a small hotel chain in this western Odisha town, started off dirt poor and became rich. And, it’s his way of paying back to society. He named ‘Bhagirathi Park’ after his father.On the outskirts of Bhawanipatna, with its meticulous landscape planning and features, Bhagirathi Park is on par with any in bigger urban centres.On any given holiday, the park is teeming with visitors not only from Kalahandi, but also from neighbouring districts such as Balangir, Nuapada and Rayagada. It’s also an integral part of the itinerary of tourists from Chhattisgarh coming to this region.Why a park of all things? “I believe parks reflect the quality of life of a community. But, Bhawanipatna, where I have grown up and succeeded in life, did not have a proper green lung to breathe. I realised that my 12-acre mango orchard could contribute to creating happiness and fill the major vacuum. I decided to make it a park which should be a gathering place for people irrespective of their age and social status,” said Mr. Khamari.It was not an easy task to translate the fancy idea into reality. One, funding was difficult. Since the park was close to his heart, Mr. Khamari decided to pay for it from his other ventures. Even harder was to organise everything and make it run efficiently. He found a motivated friend in Rabindra Patnaik, a science teacher in the local government high school.After visiting a few parks in Odisha and elsewhere, both carefully prepared the park’s landscape without disturbing the orchard. Children’s corner, water fountain, variety of flowering plants, replica of different wildlife and statues of gods and goddesses were placed as per a detailed plan.Bhagirathi Park is distinct from others in its use of waste materials and typical traditional tribal huts depicting tribal life and their customs. “Used bottles to prepare figurines, discarded commodes for planting saplings and other waste materials have been utilised to send out a message on environment. Of late, it has turned into a laboratory for local school and college students,” said Mr. Patnaik, who upkeeps the park without any remuneration.To avoid non-serious visitors, the management charges ₹20 entry fee per person per day.last_img read more

Extremists kill five persons in Assam

first_imgSuspected extremists gunned down five youths in eastern Assam’s Sadiya police district on Thursday. Police did not rule out the involvement of the United Liberation Front of Asom-Independent (ULFA-I), though the outfit did not claim responsibility.Additional Superintendent of Police Prakash Sonowal said some motorcycle-borne men indiscriminately opened fire on the youths at a dhaba at Kherbari village under the Dhola police station limits about 8.55 p.m.The victims were identified as Ananta Namasudra, Abinash Namasudra, Subal Das, Dhanai Namasudra and Syamal Biswas.“I condemn the killing of innocent people. Perpetrators of the crime would be dealt with firmly,” Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal said. He asked two Ministers and senior police officers, including Director-General of Police Kuladhar Saikia to rush to the site and deal with the situation.This is the second subversive strike in a little over a fortnight. The ULFA-I had claimed responsibility for a bomb blast in Guwahati on October 13, in which five people were injured.“This explosion was directed against those opposing the National Register of Citizens update and against those organisations supporting settling of Hindu Bangladeshis in Assam,” the outfit’s military chief Paresh Baruah had said in a statement then. Rajnath anguished In New Delhi, Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh expressed deep anguish over the killings, saying strongest possible action would be taken against the perpetrators of the heinous crime. Mr. Singh spoke to Mr. Sonowal and took stock of the situation.Outfit denies roleIn a late night statement, the United Liberation Front of Asom-Independent (ULFA-I) has denied its hand in the killings. “The killings might have happened due to the BJP government’s bid to derail NRC by pushing Citizenship Amendment Bill, 2016”, a statement from the outfit said. (With PTI inputs)last_img read more

NHM confirms control of Zika virus in Rajasthan

first_imgThe National Health Mission has confirmed the control of Zika virus in Rajasthan after the detection of more than 150 cases of infection, including those of some pregnant women, during the last few weeks. The diagnosis and treatment facilities at the government hospitals in the State were found to be in order.Effective measuresNHM Mission Director Manoj Jhalani, who is also Additional Secretary, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, said the spread of both Zika virus and dengue fever had been controlled in the State by taking up anti-larva and fogging activities on a large scale to get rid of mosquitoes spreading the virus.Mr. Jhalani said the State government’s Medical and Health Department had taken effective steps to control the spread of mosquito-borne diseases in the densely populated areas of Jaipur and other cities. He visited an urban primary health centre in Mansarovar locality here to observe the services rendered to the patients.He laid emphasis on medical treatment in an integrated manner, proper screening for non-communicable diseases and establishment of an effective referral mechanism. Additional Chief Secretary (Medical and Health) Veenu Gupta said the Zika virus had been controlled with the support and cooperation of the citizens and no fresh case had been detected in the last few days.last_img read more

After Amit Shah snub, options dwindle for RLSP chief Upendra Kushwaha

first_imgOptions are narrowing fast for Rashtriya Lok Samata Party (RLSP) chief and Union Minister Upendra Kushwaha, who is awaiting a meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi. Mr Kushwaha is likely to announce his future plans — on whether he will continue with the NDA — at a meeting of party office bearers scheduled for early December. Sources close to Mr. Kushwaha told The Hindu that while he had declared that he was waiting for Prime Minister Narendra Modi to meet with him and hear his grievances, his failure to secure a meeting with BJP chief Amit Shah was indicative of where the situation was heading. “We are still holding out for an honourable share in the NDA kitty for Bihar, but haven’t received any assurances on that point. The party will be holding a chintan baithak (internal discussion) at Valmiki Nagar in Bihar on December 4 and 5,” said the source.New formationsThe party is in discussions with socialist leader Sharad Yadav’s new party Loktantrik Janata Dal (LJD) for a merger, and is also in conversation with the Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD) for a tie up for the Bihar polls.Earlier last month, Mr. Shah had announced that the BJP and the Janata Dal (U) would be fighting an equal number of Lok Sabha seats in Bihar which has a total of 40 seats, with the rest to be divided between allies— Ram Vilas Paswan’s Lok Janshakti Party and the RLSP. Mr. Kushwaha, with some cause, is apprehending that his own share would be less than the three seats he was accorded in 2014 when the JD(U) had not been a part of the coalition. “But we haven’t been given any assurance that it was not so,” said a source.Mr Kushwaha has also been facing an internal split in his party, with one MP (out of the three including Mr. Kushwaha), Arun Kumar, making it clear that he did not accept Mr. Kushwaha’s leadership.The RJD, which has been keen for an alliance against the NDA in 2019, which includes the Congress and quite possibly the RLSP, will also negotiate. “We are in conversation with the RLSP but we have our own doubts about vote transference,” said an RJD office bearer. The proposed merger between the RLSP and the LJD is also being closely watched, as Mr Sharad Yadav’s “network in Delhi” is a cause for concern. “Delhi contacts can amplify political strength, even if its not there on the ground,” said the source.The last word on battlelines in Bihar has not been said yet.last_img read more

Srinagar’s Deputy Mayor attacked, injured in council meeting

first_imgSrinagar Municipal Corporation (SMC) Deputy Mayor Sheikh Imran was injured after corporators attacked him during an ongoing corporation session in Srinagar on Monday.Mr. Imran said he fell down after a heavy object was flung at him “by BJP and RSS-backed councillors during the meeting”.“I have been consistently opposing BJP’s footprints here and won’t tolerate any interference in our religious identity. As I was comforting myself on the seat during the meeting, BJP and RSS-backed councillors flung an object at me, resulting in multiple stitches on the face. It was a planned attack,” said Mr. Imran.Mr. Imran appealed to Governor Satya Pal Malik and the Chief Secretary to look into the matter.However, a section of corporators accused Mr. Imran of “making their lives vulnerable in Kashmir by labelling them as pro-BJP”. “Mr. Imran, and not us, is in touch with top BJP leaders of the State. We contested the elections as independents,” they alleged.Meanwhile, Mayor Junaid Azim Mattu said the house was in complete order and the handful who created a ruckus were evicted. “If there was any violence, there will be consequences as per the law,” he said.The proceedings of the council was adjourned after the incident. The police have taken cognisance of the incident.Srinagar elected 76 municipal corporators in a much-delayed elections held in October last year. The elections witnessed very low turnout as both the National Conference and Peoples Democratic Party decided to stay away from the polls.last_img read more

Rahul promises farm loan waiver across the country

first_imgCongress president Rahul Gandhi on Sunday targeted the Modi government on various issues, such as farmers’ distress and alleged favouring of corporates, while alleging that demonetisation was the “biggest scam of the world”.Addressing the party’s Jan Akansha Rally (people’s expectation rally) here, Mr. Gandhi said there would be a coalition government at the Centre and in Bihar soon as the Congress would now play on the “front foot along with its alliance partners”.He got loud cheers from the crowd when he promised that Patna University would be accorded the status of a Central university, if the Congress coalition was voted to power. Earlier, in a programme at the university, Prime Minister Narendra Modi had declined Chief Minister Nitish Kumar’s appeal for the same.“With Nalanda University and Patna University, Bihar earlier was the seat of learning in the country and the world. Now it has become the centre of unemployment …but, again Bihar will be the centre of education when our government is formed,” Mr. Gandhi said.“Along with [RJD leaders] Tejashwi [Yadav] and Lalu Prasad, we will now play on the front foot and form governments at the Centre and Bihar too after the Lok Sabha election and Bihar poll thereafter.”Mr. Gandhi alleged that “there was a debt of ₹1 lakh crore on Anil Ambani which is three times the total MGNREGA funding…PM Modi gave ₹30,000 crore to Anil Ambani in the Rafale deal and only ₹3.50 to each member of a farmer’s family in the country”.He said a Congress-led government at the Centre would waive loans of farmers of the entire country as it did in three States where it recently came to power. “Earlier, 27% of the sugar in the country was provided by the farmers of Bihar but now they could give only 2%… farmers have to pay from their own pocket for insurance of their crops but even that money goes into the pockets of Anil Ambani and Nirav Modi,” he alleged.Chief Ministers of Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Chhattisgarh too addressed the rally, along with leaders of the Grand Alliance constituents like Tejashwi Yadav, Sharad Yadav, Jitan Ram Manjhi. Rashtriya Lok Samata Party president Upendra Kushwaha couldn’t attend as he was injured in a clash with police on Saturday.last_img read more

Grand Alliance’s Supaul nominee fights local ire, RJD fire

first_imgFor the Mahagathbandhan (Grand Alliance) candidate and All India Congress Committee secretary Ranjeet Ranjan, retaining the Supaul Lok Sabha seat this time appears to be a tough challenge as discontentment among leaders of alliance partner Rashtriya Janata Dal and resentment among local people are running high against her.Though the State’s Grand Alliance leaders are trying to dispel the “confusion and chaos” against Ms. Ranjan, her fight against NDA candidate Dileshwar Kamait, contesting on a Janata Dal (United) ticket, seems evenly poised. Supaul goes to poll in the third phase on April 23. In the 2014 Lok Sabha poll, Ms. Ranjan had defeated Mr. Kamait by over 55,000 votes and the then BJP candidate, Kameshwar Chaupal, had finished third. “In this election, the JD(U) and BJP votes have got combined against the Congress candidate and she will have to struggle hard to retain the seat,” said Maheshwar Yadav, a businessman from Pipra. Besides, he added, “The issue of Balakot air strike and nationalism too runs high among the young voters.”RJD vote bank In the last election, Ms. Ranjan had won with the support of the RJD vote bank. However, this time the local RJD leaders are not keen to support Ms. Ranjan as her husband Rajesh Ranjan alias Pappu Yadav, the sitting MP from the neighbouring constituency of Madhepura, is contesting from there as an Independent candidate.The RJD leaders of Supaul want him to withdraw his nomination in favour of the Mahagathbandhan candidate from the seat, Sharad Yadav. “How can we support Ranjeet Ranjan here in Supaul when her husband is contesting against our candidate in Madhepura? As a reciprocal gesture, Pappu Yadav should withdraw his nomination from Madhepura, otherwise we will remain silent and neutral,” said a local RJD leader.Earlier, an RJD MLA from Pipra and party’s district president Yaduvansh Yadav had threatened to file his nomination as an Independent candidate against Ms. Ranjan but later, after the intervention of RJD and Congress leaders, he agreed to drop the plan.Message to Pappu YadavSources in the local RJD told The Hindu that the RJD MLA was acting at the behest of the party’s top leadership to send a message to Mr. Pappu Yadav to “remain in his limits”. The Madhepura MP has relentlessly attacked RJD leader Tejashwi Yadav and party chief Lalu Prasad. “Though the local RJD leaders and supporters are not opposing Ranjeet Ranjan, they have become silent and neutral,” said Ramadhin Yadav of Supaul bazaar area.Supaul Lok Sabha constituency has a sizeable number of Yadav and Extremely Backward Class voters.The Congress nominee is also grappling with the resentment of the local people who complain about her absence from the constituency. “After winning the poll last time she settled down in Delhi. She hardly visited here to know about our problems,” rued voters of Triveniganj, Chhatapur and Pipra areas. But they also admitted that Ms. Ranjan has been working hard to retain the seat. “Let’s see what happens,” they said.“Initially there was an attempt to create confusion among the Grand Alliance rank and file after Pappu Yadav refused to reconsider his nomination [from Madhepura], but things became smooth after the intervention of senior leaders from the RJD and the Congress,” State Congress president Madan Mohan Jha told journalists recently.Ms. Ranjan too exuded confidence that she was getting “full cooperation” from the local RJD leaders and said they too have been given key poll responsibilities.last_img read more

Top Stories: A Blood Test for Suicide, Bats Linked to Deadly MERS, and a Controversial Drilling Plan

first_imgCheck out this latest installment of Science’s weekly news podcast, ranked the best science podcast in WIRED’s 101 Signals.Free Papers Have Reached a Tipping Point, Study ClaimsOpen access has reached a milestone: Fifty percent of all papers are now freely available within a year or two of publication, concludes a new study. The study’s authors say that open-access publishing has reached a “tipping point” and will now accelerate. But some observers have been quick to criticize the study, which yielded a number twice as high as other analyses.A Blood Test for Suicide?Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)What if a psychiatrist could tell whether someone was about to commit suicide simply by taking a sample of their blood? That’s the promise of new research, which finds increased amounts of a particular protein in the bloodstream of those contemplating killing themselves.Bat Out of Hell? Egyptian Tomb Bat May Harbor MERS VirusScientists say that they are one step closer to understanding the deadly new Middle East respiratory syndrome virus. They have found a small fragment of the virus’s genome in an Egyptian tomb bat from Saudi Arabia, suggesting that these bats are a source of the virus—although another animal species may act as the bridge to humans.Sometimes It Pays to Be a WeaklingSometimes it’s better not to be the best. Take rams. Those with bigger horns get the girl and make babies more often—but they also die younger. The weaker rams are less lucky in love and have fewer babies each season, but their longer lifetimes mean that they get a few more goes around the mating merry-go-round, managing to produce a few good offspring themselves. The tradeoff helps explain a long-standing puzzle about why the best genes for mating don’t take over, and why there are always plenty of small, weak males among the supermen.Ecuador Says It Will Launch Controversial Drilling in Amazon ParkThe president of Ecuador says that he will move ahead with controversial plans to drill for oil in the Amazon Basin’s renowned Yasuni National Park. Researchers consider the park to be one of the world’s richest biological hotspots.last_img read more

ScienceShot: ‘Chicken From Hell’ Unearthed in American Midwest

first_imgThis newly described dinosaur might look like a chicken, but don’t be fooled: It was nearly 4 meters long, weighed about 250 kilograms, and lived 66 million years ago in what is today the Hell Creek rock formation in North and South Dakota. That’s why its discoverers are calling it the “chicken from hell,” and indeed it was related to early birds and to feathered, birdlike dinos that brooded over their nests, such as Oviraptor. Scientifically, however, the team has named it Anzu wyliei—Anzu after a birdlike demon in Mesopotamian mythology, and wyliei after Wylie, the young grandson of a trustee of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh, where a cast of the dino is now on display. The creature had a toothless beak, sharp claws, and a tall crest on top of its head. It is the largest Oviraptor-like dinosaur found in North America, the researchers report today in PLOS ONE.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Proteins and a pregnancy woe

first_imgPreeclampsia, the leading cause of death in pregnant women, is a medical mystery and a disorder that every obstetrician dreads. Without warning, the blood pressure of a seemingly healthy pregnant woman may surge; if the baby isn’t delivered right away, she may die. Preeclampsia kills an estimated 76,000 women worldwide each year, but no one knows its cause or how to prevent it. Now, a new study this week in Science Translational Medicine demonstrates that—like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and mad cow diseases—preeclampsia is distinguished by misfolded and clumped proteins. The finding offers an entirely new take on this complication of pregnancy, and pinpoints a potential biomarker, so that a simple urine analysis could definitively diagnose a disorder that has lacked a gold standard test.For more, see the full story in this week’s issue of Science.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Top stories: Disappearing ground water, a boost for NSF, and the earliest dinos

first_imgDid Brazil’s uncontacted tribe receive proper medical care?Scientists and Brazil’s government disagree about whether the isolated Amazon tribespeople who came down with flu after making contact with the outside world last month received adequate medical treatment. At least one scientist fears that the illness is just the start of a health catastrophe for the tribe and blames the government for not taking fuller precautions before the tribespeople slipped back into the forest.Western U.S. states using up ground water at an alarming rateSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)A new study shows that ground water in the Colorado River Basin is being depleted six times faster than surface water. The groundwater losses, which take thousands of years to be recharged naturally, point to the unsustainability of exploding population centers and water-intensive agriculture in the basin, which includes most of Arizona and parts of Colorado, California, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, and Wyoming.Senate bill backs NSF’s practices and calls for big funding boostTaking issue with its counterpart in the U.S. House of Representatives, a Senate panel has embraced how the National Science Foundation (NSF) does its business in a bill that sets policies and recommends funding levels for NSF over the next 5 years. The proposed legislation calls on Congress to increase NSF’s budget by nearly 40%, to $9.9 billion, by 2019. It also endorses NSF’s current policies for reviewing grant proposals and—in sharp contrast to a House bill—emphasizes the importance of the social sciences as part of a balanced research portfolio.Earliest dinosaurs may have sported feathersResearchers agree that birds are dinosaurs, but when did dinosaurs start becoming birds? New excavations in Siberia reveal that one sure sign of birdiness, the presence of feathers, has very deep roots in the dino evolutionary tree; indeed, dinosaurs may have been sporting feathers from the very beginning of their existence about 240 million years ago.Nervous system may hold key to treating asthma attacksThe wheezing, coughing, and gasping for breath that come with a sudden asthma attack aren’t just the fault of an overactive immune system. A particularly sensitive bundle of neurons stretching from the brain to the lungs might be to blame as well, researchers have found. Drugs that alter these neurons could provide a new way to treat some types of asthma.last_img read more

Octopus supermom sets egg-brooding record

first_imgA female deep-sea octopus has smashed the record for egg brooding. The devoted mom, a Graneledone boreopacifica, held her eggs in her arms for 4.5 years, until they hatched—and she apparently died. Scientists first spotted her and her eggs in 2007 during one of their regular visits, via a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), to the deep-sea habitat of Monterey Submarine Canyon off the coast of California. She was perched on a rocky outcrop 1397 meters below the ocean’s surface, with her arms curled around her clutch (see video above). Over the next 53 months, the scientists returned to the outcrop 18 times—and each time, there was the female, still patiently guarding her eggs, they report today in PLOS ONE. During their visits, they noticed that she never ate; rather than hunting crabs and shrimp, she pushed them away anytime they got too close to her eggs. She even ignored a tempting bit of crabmeat the scientists extended to her by means of one of the ROV’s arms. They suspect that she may have ingested damaged or unfertilized eggs to stay alive, but the marathon egg brooding took its toll. When the scientists first saw her, she was a pale purple, but over time she turned a ghostly white, her mantle shrank, her skin slackened, and her eyes grew cloudy. The researchers last saw her in September 2011. On their next visit the following month, she was gone; female octopuses invariably die after brooding. Only the tattered remnants of her empty egg capsules remained, indicating a successful hatch.last_img read more

Video: ‘Gentle’ microscope captures tiny life in action

first_imgMicroscopists have been able to peer deep into cells, thanks to fluorescent molecules that stick to cellular structures. But the powerful light sources—often lasers—required to activate the fluorescent molecules also burn them out and spark toxic chemical reactions inside cells. A team led by engineering physicist Eric Betzig of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Ashburn, Virginia, has now devised a gentler method, called lattice light-sheet microscopy, that can capture high-resolution 3D images. The approach is less destructive because it illuminates with a lattice, or grid, of light, spreading the energy hitting the specimen. And it’s typically faster than spinning disk confocal microscopy, one of the leading fluorescence microscopy methods. Thus, researchers can observe microscopic action, such as cell and molecular movements, for longer periods of time. Betzig, who shared this year’s Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a different technique that greatly increased microscope resolution, and his colleagues show off the capabilities of lattice light-sheet microscopy online today in Science. They follow individual proteins in clusters of stem cells, trace cellular migration in a developing fruit fly larva, and observe muscle contractions in a nematode embryo (see video, above), among other tasks. Betzig says he’s prouder of lattice light-sheet microscopy than he is of the work that earned him the Nobel Prize. “It’s like having a new baby.”*Correction, 24 October, 1:52 p.m.: This item has been corrected. The original item stated that the video was of a protozoan. It is in fact a video of a nematode embryo.(Video credit: Betzig Lab, HHMI)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Eight genes that make us brainiacs

first_imgIn the animal kingdom, humans are known for our big brains. But not all brains are created equal, and now we have new clues as to why that is. Researchers have uncovered eight genetic variations that help determine the size of key brain regions. These variants may represent “the genetic essence of humanity,” says Stephan Sanders, a geneticist and pediatrician at the University of California, San Francisco, who was not involved in the study.These results are among the first to come out of the ENIGMA (Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) collaboration, involving some 300 scientists from 33 countries. They contributed MRI scans of more than 30,000 people, along with genetic and other information, most of which had been collected for other reasons. “This paper represents a herculean effort,” Sanders says.Only by pooling their efforts could the researchers track down subtle genetic influences on brain size that would have eluded discovery in smaller studies. “We were surprised we found anything at all,” says Paul Thompson, a neuroscientist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. But in the end, “we were able to identify hot points in the genome that help build the brain.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)For the analyses, Thompson and his colleagues looked for single-letter (nucleotide base) changes in DNA that correspond to the sizes of key brain regions. One region, the hippocampus, stores memories and helps one learn. Another, called the caudate nucleus, makes it possible to ride a bike, play an instrument, or drive a car without really thinking about it. A third is the putamen, which is involved in running, walking, and moving the body as well as in motivation. The researchers did not try to examine the neocortex, the part of the brain that helps us think and is proportionally much bigger in humans than in other animals. The neocortex has crevices on its surface that look so different from one individual to the next that it’s really hard to measure consistently across labs.There’s a strong link between the sizes of many of these parts of the brain and overall cognitive ability, Thompson says. “Having more brain tissue is better.” Diseases such as Alzheimer’s damage the hippocampus, while Parkinson’s, for example, impairs the putamen.The team discovered eight “letter” differences that can shrink brain tissue by about 1.5%, depending on the letter inherited, Thompson and his colleagues report online today in Nature. Some of the letter variants were inside a gene, while others were near key genes.The most influential gene pinned down, KTN1, helps tell brain cells where to go in the putamen. Two additional variants in the putamen are associated with genes that can cause colon or immune system cancers and seem to regulate the number of cells in that brain region. The remaining five genes do various things, including inhibit programmed cell death, a natural process that can cause brain regions to shrink if it goes unchecked.Many of the eight genes are active during brain development and may play a role in neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, Sanders says. He hopes ENIGMA researchers will next look to see if there are links between a particular brain region’s size and one of these disorders. At this point, a genetic test for these variants won’t be much help in the clinic, says Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, a developmental cognitive neuroscientist at University College London who was not involved with the work. To diagnose patients, “you go not by what’s inside the brain or what’s inside the gene, but by what symptoms the patient is showing,” she says. Still, “it’s good to know that these structures have genetic variation,” she says. “It alerts physicians to the relationship between genes, brain structure, and behavior,” a relationship that may one day become useful to clinicians.last_img read more

A Story of Culinary Apartheid

first_imgAn enforced culture of want among India’s most marginalized gave birth to unique dishes of dried meats, offal and breads—but every morsel is painful Related Itemslast_img