Back with a vengeance

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How to… Assess the new kids on the software block

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First Brum core offices in years

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Marketing: Driving ambitions

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Heading for overload

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Online census begins despite glitches

first_img“We received many complaints, including slow webpage load times and downed connections. We have forwarded these concerns [to the BPS central office],” he said on Sunday.Unlike past censuses, the 2020 census uses both door-to-door interviews and an online platform, the first ever the decennial census has gone digital since its inception in 1961.The online census is available from Feb. 15 to March 31 via sensus.bps.go.id. Citizens need their family card (KK) and ID card (NIK) numbers to complete the online registration process. The online census will be followed by a door-to-door census and phone interviews in July for those who do not or cannot access the online census.The online questionnaire has a total of 22 questions, ranging from the registrant’s name, date of birth, place of birth, religion, education level and occupation. The online census also asks residents for their current address as well as the address on their ID card, even if they currently reside and work elsewhere. The 2020 population census by Statistics Indonesia (BPS) has started. The online phase, which is expected to ease access for public participation across the country, has begun, but glitches have plagued the launch.Less than a week after the online census started, some residents, such as those in North Sumatra where authorities aim to have 20 percent of North Sumatra residents, or 3 million people, taking part in the online census, encountered slow webpage loading when people attempted to fill in the online form.Mukhamad Mukhanit from BPS’ North Sumatra office said it was because the servers unexpectedly became overloaded when multiple people accessed the website at the same time. “It’s not that past censuses were inaccurate, only that they have different definitions [of residencies],” said BPS spokeswoman Endang Retno Sri Subiya Andani.This year is also the first such census to use existing civil registration data from the Home Ministry.The census, Endang said, would also be used to update the civil registration data. Citizens who are found to have no civil documents during field interviews will be referred to the Home Ministry for registration.Amelia Rizky, a 20-year-old college student in West Jakarta has filled in the online census for her family, including her mother and father, who have just moved from their first house in Tangerang, Banten — which is also their current ID card address — to a newly purchased second house in West Jakarta. The family opted for the online census as they did not want to change their ID card addresses.“With only one login ID we can complete [the census] for the whole family, so we don’t have to repeat it again. It also caters to the needs of people with current addresses different from their ID card addresses, like us,” Amelia said.Security was the only concern for Amelia when entering her family’s information on the online form.“Nowadays, data theft is a major concern, and here [on the online census], we are talking about birth certificates, employment and other sensitive data,” she said. “But what can we do, it’s an [important] census.”The online census comes amid the absence of data protection laws in Indonesia.The BPS has been working with the National Cyber and Encryption Agency (BSSN) and Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), among other institutions, to ensure data security and privacy during the online registration process.Wahyudi Djafar, a researcher at the Institute for Policy Research and Advocacy (ELSAM), said that although the online census had received a pass from the BSSN, it does not mean that BPS, as the data holder, does not need to take additional precautions to protect the data.“The system may be safe, but there is still a possibility [of a data breach],” Wahyudi said.The BPS has set a budget of Rp 4 trillion (US$ 292.9 million) for the 2020 census, compared to the reported Rp 3.3 trillion in 2010.Endang said the ongoing online census was predicted to help reduce the number of field workers for the coming door-to-door interview. BPS is planning to hire around 390,000 volunteers starting in early April to help with the 2020 census fieldwork in July.“Our initial target is to have 23 percent of the census carried out online nationwide. If we can reach more than that, it would even reduce the cost of the census.”The 2020 census is expected to help Indonesia keep track of its demographic dividend, that the country is expected to benefit from with its huge working-age population — projected to reach 70 percent of the total population by 2030.A 2015 intercensal survey projected that Indonesia would have a population of around 266.9 million in 2019, which may leap to 319 million by 2045.University of Indonesia (UI) Demographic Institute associate director I Dewa Gede Karma Wisana said the 2020 census was a step to improve demographic analysis because it now integrated and compared data from the census with existing registration data.“With that data integration, we can expect better policy interventions from the central government and regional administrations,” he said, adding that census data was usually used for long or medium-term development plans while the registration data was used for immediate policy making.Topics :last_img read more

Coronavirus outbreak is ‘global pandemic’: German health minister

first_imgThe coronavirus outbreak has turned into “a global pandemic”, German Health Minister Jens Spahn said Wednesday, warning that worse was to come.The situation in Germany and across Europe had changed drastically in recent days, he said, with Germany reporting a sharp uptick to 240 cases.”The coronavirus outbreak in China has become a global pandemic,” Spahn told German lawmakers. “The situation is changing very quickly,” he said. “What’s clear is that we have not yet reached the peak of the outbreak.”The World Health Organization (WHO) has so far stopped short of declaring a pandemic — defined as an epidemic that spreads throughout the world through local transmission.But it has urged countries to prepare for a potential pandemic.The number of novel coronavirus cases in the world has now risen to more than 93,000, including 3,201 deaths across 81 countries and territories. In Germany, Spahn said efforts remained focussed on containing the disease and slowing its spread, including through quarantining people ill with COVID-19 and cancelling large gatherings such as trade fairs.”When in doubt, the safety of the public comes first, including before economic interests,” Spahn said.He added that the government was also updating its medical guidelines to make sure that overstretched health workers concentrate their efforts “on the most acute” cases if the outbreak worsens.That could also mean that non-urgent surgeries might be postponed, he said, stressing however that “we aren’t there yet”.Earlier on Wednesday, the German interior ministry announced a ban on exports of medical protective gear to avoid a shortage of masks, gloves and other supplies for medical workers.”The next days and weeks will be challenging. There will be restrictions on everyday life in affected areas and that can cause some stress,” Spahn said.But he said the government was working closely with regional states and European partners to respond to the virus “in a cool-headed way” and take “appropriate measures”.Topics :last_img read more

Indonesia reports second COVID-19 death in Surakarta

first_imgA top official reported on Friday that a novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patient had died in Surakarta, Central Java. It was the second COVID-19 death in the country.”The result had come back, he had tested positive [for COVID-19],” Achmad Yurianto of the Health Ministry’s Disease Control and Prevention Directorate General,  told kompas.com on Friday.The Jakarta Post tried to confirm the news with Yurianto on Friday but he had yet to respond to questions at the time of writing.Yurianto said the Surakarta Health Agency was tracking the deceased’s travel history and close contacts. Topics : Eko Haryanti, the legal and public relations head at Dr. Moewardi Regional General Hospital, affirmed that the individual who died on Wednesday, previously considered a suspected case, had tested positive for COVID-19.She stressed, however, that this was a general statement, as the health ministry held jurisdiction over official statements.”We have also not received any official information from the ministry,” Haryanti said on Friday.Earlier on Thursday, the hospital reported that a COVID-19 suspected patient had died at the hospital.Harsini, a pulmonologist at the hospital, said the patient was admitted to the hospital on Sunday along with one other suspected COVID-19 case.Both suspects, each aged 59 and 60 year old, did not have any recent travel history outside the country, although they did visit Bogor, West Java from Feb. 25-28.They complained of a cough and fever after returning from Bogor. The hospital had taken samples from the patient’s nose and throat to be tested for coronavirus, however one of the patients died before the results had come back.”The hospital has not determined the patient’s the exact cause of death but there is a possibility that the patient died due to coronavirus infection,” she told the Post on Thursday.Harsini said the deceased had a pre-existing medical condition.”The COVID-19 suspect who passed away had diabetes. We tracked the suspects’ close contacts,” she said.Dr. Moewardi General Hospital legal and public relations head Eko Haryanti told the Post that the deceased had experienced respiratory failure upon arrival at the hospital.”After returning from Bogor they started showing cold-like symptoms like coughing and sneezing. When the deceased was admitted to the hospital on Sunday evening, he had already experienced respiratory failure. We’ve handed all of the COVID-19 suspects’ medical history to the Health Ministry,” Eko said.Harsini explained that the hospital treated the deceased’s body in accordance with the established protocol to contain the H5N1 virus, which is a known cause for bird flu or avian influenza.”We treated the body like a patient of bird flu. We put him in plastic body bag and asked [family members] not to open it during the burial, so he will be buried in it,” Harsini told the Post on Thursday. (nal)last_img read more

Coronavirus reaches Kyrgyzstan, via Saudi Arabia

first_imgTopics : Kyrgyzstan has confirmed its first coronavirus cases, as three citizens tested positive after arriving from Saudi Arabia, the healthcare minister said on Wednesday, a day after the Central Asian country closed its borders to all foreigners.Healthcare Minister Kosmosbek Cholponbayev delivered news that the pandemic had reached the landlocked nation of 6 million people at a news briefing.Kyrgyzstan borders China, where the outbreak first began in December, and two of its neighbors, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, also confirmed their first cases this month. All three countries and Tajikistan, another former Soviet central Asian republic, have moved to ban or limit public events and suspended Friday prayers at mosques.Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan have also closed their borders and the former is locking down two of its biggest cities to contain the outbreak. last_img read more

Jakartans called to work from home during outbreak. Not everyone has the option.

first_imgWhile many Jakartans are staying in their houses and working remotely to curb the novel coronavirus outbreak, home office is not even an option for many other workers in the capital and its satellite cities.Lesmana, an employee of a Jakarta-based oil and gas company, was among those still doing their morning commute to the office on Monday, even though a state of emergency over the COVID-19 pandemic had been declared in the capital city — the hardest-hit area of the country.The 60-year-old said the company, which had employed him at its logistics department for 12 years, still required him to come in to work, as some tasks needed to be done in person. Radita Nur Aini shared a similar experience, as she still had to take a public minibus from her rooming house in Cimanggu district in Bogor, West Java, to her office in Parung district, an area southwest of South Jakarta, on Monday.The 25-year-old, who works as an administrative staff member at a leasing company, said she could not do anything but follow her company’s policy that still required her to do her job from the office despite the COVID-19 outbreak, particularly since she had just been working there for a month.She realized that taking the minivan might not be the wisest thing to do right now, but the cost of travel was much lower than if she took an app-based taxi, which could cost her Rp 50,000 (US$3) per ride.”It takes 45 minutes to travel with two changes and costs Rp 9,000 per trip,” she said.The number of confirmed coronavirus cases has continued to surge in the capital over the past weeks, with Jakarta alone reporting 356 positive cases out of 579 infections nationwide as of Monday. Forty-nine people have died from the virus to date, including 31 in Jakarta.Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan declared a two-week state of emergency on Friday, urging all stakeholders to take drastic measures to slow the transmission of the disease, as concerns mount that COVID-19 could spread in offices, public places and public transportation.Read also: Jakarta declares emergency, but doubts persist over compliance with social distancing directiveCorporations have been urged to stop operations for 14 days starting Monday or introduce work-from-home policies and reduce the number of employees working in the office to a minimum if the companies were unable to close their offices.Authorities also advised the public to stay at home whenever possible and maintain social distancing as hospitals scrambled to treat coronavirus patients.As of Monday, at least 1,512 companies across the capital have put in place work-from-home policies for some 517,743 of their employees in response to the outbreak, according to the Jakarta Manpower and Transmigration Agency.Rahma, another worker in Jakarta who still had to go to work on Monday, expressed hope that the manufacturing company she works for would heed the Jakarta administration’s call.The 25-year-old said she had to endure anxiety while commuting to work using the Transjakarta bus from Slipi to Kalideres in West Jakarta but had no other option, as the company said it would not meet production targets if employees did not come to work.”The virus has taken lives, and I guess we should follow the government’s call […]. I actually disagree with my company’s policy that prevents us from working from home, but all I can do now is just follow the company’s rules,” she told the Post. (trn)Topics : As usual, he took the Transjakarta bus on the route connecting Tanjung Priok in North Jakarta with Cililitan Wholesale Center (PGC) in East Jakarta and got off at Kebon Nanas Station on Monday morning.Although the city-owned bus company only allowed four to five standing passengers in line with the social-distancing order, Lesmana admitted that he was concerned about getting infected while commuting to work as the coronavirus spread rapidly.”Of course I am worried, but what can I do? I have no other [transportation] option,” Lesmana told The Jakarta Post on Monday.Read also: COVID-19: Does Indonesia need a lockdown? It depends on how you define itlast_img read more